Using the Behavior Change Wheel to Understand University Students’ Prolonged Sitting Time and Identify Potential Intervention Strategies

Castro, Oscar and Vergeer, Ineke and Bennie, Jason and Cagas, Jonathan and Biddle, Stuart J.H. (2020) Using the Behavior Change Wheel to Understand University Students’ Prolonged Sitting Time and Identify Potential Intervention Strategies. International Journal of Behavioral Medicine. pp. 1-12. ISSN 1070-5503

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Abstract

Background
Several national public health guidelines recommend individuals minimize time spent in prolonged, continuous periods of sitting. Developing effective interventions to break up sitting, however, requires in-depth understanding of the behavior as well as identification of the key elements that need to be targeted to achieve change. This qualitative study focused on university students – a highly sedentary group – with the aim of: (i) exploring the factors influencing prolonged sitting time in this population; and (ii) identifying potential avenues for future intervention, based on the Behavior Change Wheel framework.

Method
Eighteen ambulatory undergraduate students participated in semi-structured one-on-one interviews, using the Capability, Opportunity, Motivation, Behavior (COM-B) model and the complementary Theoretical Domains Framework (TDF) as the theoretical framework. Data were analyzed using a directed content analysis approach, followed by inductive thematic analysis.

Results
All COM-B components and eight TDF domains were identified as relevant for influencing the target behavior.

Conclusion
Findings suggest that interventions and policies aimed at reducing prolonged sitting time in university students should: (i) raise awareness about negative health implications; (ii) address productivity concerns; (iii) provide training in behavioral self-regulation; (iv) use external reminders; (v) implement habit formation techniques; and (vi) promote social acceptability for breaking up sitting.


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Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Institute for Resilient Regions - Centre for Health Research (1 Apr 2020 -)
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Institute for Resilient Regions - Centre for Health Research (1 Apr 2020 -)
Date Deposited: 09 Sep 2020 05:54
Last Modified: 14 Sep 2020 01:50
Uncontrolled Keywords: college students; sedentary behavior; sedentary time; intervention mapping; implementation research
Fields of Research (2008): 11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1117 Public Health and Health Services > 111705 Environmental and Occupational Health and Safety
11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1117 Public Health and Health Services > 111712 Health Promotion
11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1106 Human Movement and Sports Science > 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
Identification Number or DOI: 10.1007/s12529-020-09926-0
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/39417

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