Stability of Jovian Trojans and their collisional families

Holt, Timothy R. and Nesvorny, David and Horner, Jonathan and King, Rachel ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-3302-0919 and Marschall, Raphael and Kamrowski, Melissa and Carter, Brad ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-0035-8769 and Brookshaw, Leigh and Tylor, Christopher (2020) Stability of Jovian Trojans and their collisional families. Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 495 (4). pp. 4085-4097. ISSN 0035-8711

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Abstract

The Jovian Trojans are two swarms of objects located around the L4 and L5 Lagrange points. The population is thought to have been captured by Jupiter during the Solar system’s youth. Within the swarms, six collisional families have been identified in previous work, with four in the L4 swarm, and two in the L5. Our aim is to investigate the stability of the two Trojan swarms, with a particular focus on these collisional families. We find that the members of Trojan swarms escape the population at a linear rate, with the primordial L4 (23.35 per cent escape) and L5 (24.89 per cent escape) population sizes likely 1.31 and 1.35 times larger than today. Given that the escape rates were approximately equal between the two Trojan swarms, our results do not explain the observed asymmetry between the two groups, suggesting that the numerical differences are primordial in nature, supporting previous studies. Upon leaving the Trojan population, the escaped objects move on to orbits that resemble those of the Centaur and short-period comet populations. Within the Trojan collisional families, the 1996 RJ and 2001 UV209 families are found to be dynamically stable over the lifetime of the Solar system, whilst the Hektor, Arkesilos and Ennomos families exhibit various degrees of instability. The larger Eurybates family shows 18.81 per cent of simulated members escaping the Trojan population. Unlike the L4 swarm, the escape rate from the Eurybates family is found to increase as a function of time, allowing an age estimation of approximately 1.045 ± 0.364 × 109 yr.


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Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Additional Information: This article has been accepted for publication in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, Volume 495, Issue 4, July 2020, Pages 4085-4097, https://doi.org/10.1093/mnras/staa1348. Copyright 2020 The Author(s). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Royal Astronomical Society. All rights reserved.
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Institute for Advanced Engineering and Space Sciences - Centre for Astrophysics (1 Aug 2018 -)
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Institute for Advanced Engineering and Space Sciences - Centre for Astrophysics (1 Aug 2018 -)
Date Deposited: 28 Aug 2020 02:13
Last Modified: 31 Aug 2020 04:51
Uncontrolled Keywords: methods: numerical; minor planets; asteroids: general; Astrophysics -; Earth and Planetary Astrophysics
Fields of Research (2008): 02 Physical Sciences > 0201 Astronomical and Space Sciences > 020110 Stellar Astronomy and Planetary Systems
02 Physical Sciences > 0201 Astronomical and Space Sciences > 020108 Planetary Science (excl. Extraterrestrial Geology)
Fields of Research (2020): 51 PHYSICAL SCIENCES > 5101 Astronomical sciences > 510109 Stellar astronomy and planetary systems
51 PHYSICAL SCIENCES > 5199 Other physical sciences > 519999 Other physical sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio-Economic Objectives (2008): E Expanding Knowledge > 97 Expanding Knowledge > 970102 Expanding Knowledge in the Physical Sciences
Identification Number or DOI: https://doi.org/10.1093/mnras/staa1348
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/39330

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