Recipes from the Gingerbread House: Exploring the Witch Archetype to Address the Hidden Curriculum in Secondary Schools

Russell, Ann (2018) Recipes from the Gingerbread House: Exploring the Witch Archetype to Address the Hidden Curriculum in Secondary Schools. In: The Fishbowl: Exploring Works in Progress Colloquium Program, 14 Nov, 2018, Toowoomba, Australia.


Abstract

Some of the issues we deal with in society: stereotypes, vilification and ‘othering’ have their roots in the classroom, often generated and perpetuated by means of the ‘hidden curriculum’. The hidden curriculum involves the beliefs and values that are implied (rather than made explicit) to students by means of teaching and administrative practices (Rodriguez & Mai, 2012). It both reflects and perpetuates beliefs according to ideologies of the prevailing political power; often based on an erroneous or skewed understanding of historic and anthropological developments. My research project for the Doctor of Creative Arts utilises the fairy tale metaphor to draw on my extensive experience as a visual art educator and explores the hidden curriculum in schools by drawing on Hansel and Gretel to seek fresh insights into ways of educating students within the contemporary context. In this metaphor, the secondary art classroom or studio is likened to the Gingerbread House and the art teacher to the witch. Exploration of the witch as a teacher of creativity reveals her powerful ability to disrupt the messages of the hidden curriculum such as gender stereotyping and the deterrence of diversity. The purpose of this project is to use creative practice to disrupt the hidden curriculum and suggest alternatives which may contribute to a more sustainable and egalitarian culture.

As the project has progressed, my dual role of artist and teacher has reinforced my role as the ‘witch’ – making magic and casting spells during the making as well as through what the artwork might communicate. However, this aspect can confuse the scope of the witch, particularly as it pertains to the ‘Hansels and Gretels’ (students) and their processing of the hidden curriculum. Consequently, and since they belong to a completely different tale, circumventing rabbit holes has become an important part of the research project.

Reference
Rodriguez, R. G., & Mai, D. (2012). The Hidden Curriculum. Military Medicine, 177(9), 999-1001.


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Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (Commonwealth Reporting Category E) (Speech)
Refereed: No
Item Status: Live Archive
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Historic - Faculty of Business, Education, Law and Arts - School of Arts and Communication (1 Jul 2013 - 28 Feb 2019)
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Historic - Faculty of Business, Education, Law and Arts - School of Arts and Communication (1 Jul 2013 - 28 Feb 2019)
Date Deposited: 10 Aug 2020 01:04
Last Modified: 13 Oct 2020 04:24
Uncontrolled Keywords: Visual Art, Hidden Curriculum, Arts in Education, Learning, Hidden Curriculum, Rairy Tales, Hansel and Gretel
Fields of Research (2008): 22 Philosophy and Religious Studies > 2203 Philosophy > 220301 Aesthetics
19 Studies in Creative Arts and Writing > 1901 Art Theory and Criticism > 190104 Visual Cultures
19 Studies in Creative Arts and Writing > 1905 Visual Arts and Crafts > 190502 Fine Arts (incl. Sculpture and Painting)
22 Philosophy and Religious Studies > 2203 Philosophy > 220306 Feminist Theory
13 Education > 1302 Curriculum and Pedagogy > 130201 Creative Arts, Media and Communication Curriculum and Pedagogy
13 Education > 1301 Education Systems > 130106 Secondary Education
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/39269

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