Responding to the accumulation of adverse childhood experiences in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic: implications for practice

Bryce, India ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-3616-8003 (2020) Responding to the accumulation of adverse childhood experiences in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic: implications for practice. Children Australia. pp. 1-8. ISSN 1035-0772

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Abstract

In early 2020, the world as we knew it began to change dramatically and rapidly with the COVID-19 outbreak. Social distancing restrictions and lockdown measures have been the most effective course of action and an inarguably imperative approach at this time. However, in trying to keep the global population safe, social distancing measures unwittingly placed children already experiencing maltreatment and disadvantage in harm’s way. This paper will consider the evidence base which attests to the importance of considering the accumulation of adversity when seeking to understand risk and impact of child maltreatment and disadvantage. Given the unique and unprecedented circumstances which have accompanied the COVID-19 outbreak, and the dearth of research pertaining to the impact of pandemics on child welfare, the paper draws on an emerging body of literature about the effect of natural disasters, conflict and significant global events on child maltreatment. The paper synthesises the research to date in order to call attention to the cumulative impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on children already experiencing abuse and neglect. The paper concludes with an outline of the implications for practice in the helping professions.


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Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Faculty of Business, Education, Law and Arts - School of Education (1 July 2019 -)
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Faculty of Business, Education, Law and Arts - School of Education (1 July 2019 -)
Date Deposited: 27 Jul 2020 05:48
Last Modified: 31 Jul 2020 02:11
Uncontrolled Keywords: accumulation; cumulative harm; child maltreatment; COVID-19; pandemic; child abuse and neglect
Fields of Research (2008): 16 Studies in Human Society > 1607 Social Work > 160702 Counselling, Welfare and Community Services
Identification Number or DOI: 10.1017/cha.2020.27
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/39065

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