Oral nutritional supplements for preventing surgical site infections: protocol for a systematic review and meta-analysis

Ralph, Nicholas ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-7404-9996 and Brown, Lindsay and McKillop, Kristy L. and Duff, Jed and Osborne, Sonya ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-2826-0627 and Terry, Victoria R. and Edward, Karen-Leigh and King, Rachel ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-3302-0919 and Barui, Edward (2020) Oral nutritional supplements for preventing surgical site infections: protocol for a systematic review and meta-analysis. Systematic Reviews, 9:37. pp. 1-10.

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Abstract

Background: Surgical site infections (SSIs) are among the most common healthcare-associated infections. Under- nutrition is an important risk factor for SSIs and can lead to delayed wound healing and longer hospital stays. Oral nutritional supplements are prescribed to reduce the risk of infection and improve health status, but data from randomised controlled trials (RCTs) have shown mixed results. Thus, the objective of our planned systematic review is to evaluate oral nutritional supplements on preventing SSIs in adult surgical patients

Methods: RCTs conducted in adult surgical patients who receive oral nutritional support will be included. The primary outcome will be the incidence of SSIs (within 30 days of surgery or within 90 days for joint replacement surgery). Secondary outcomes will be changes in nutritional status, mortality, health-related quality of life and costs. Literature searches will be conducted in several electronic databases (from inception onwards): MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL and The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL). Grey literature will be identified through searching clinical trial registers and dissertation databases. Two reviewers will independently screen all citations, full-text articles and abstract data. The study methodological quality (or bias) will be appraised using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. If feasible, we will conduct random effects meta-analysis where appropriate.

Discussion: This systematic review will evaluate the evidence for pre- and post-surgical intervention with oral nutritional supplements in adults. Findings from this planned review may inform subsequent nutritional interventions for hospitalised patients who undergo surgery.


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Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Faculty of Health, Engineering and Sciences - School of Nursing and Midwifery (1 Jan 2015 -)
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Faculty of Health, Engineering and Sciences - School of Health and Wellbeing (1 Jan 2015 -)
Date Deposited: 24 Jul 2020 07:05
Last Modified: 26 Jul 2020 23:55
Uncontrolled Keywords: Surgical site infection; Malnutrition; Nutrition; Surgery
Fields of Research (2008): 11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1110 Nursing > 111002 Clinical Nursing: Primary (Preventative)
Socio-Economic Objectives (2008): E Expanding Knowledge > 97 Expanding Knowledge > 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
Identification Number or DOI: 10.1186/s13643-020-01293-x
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/38941

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