Win-win: Improved irrigation management saves water and increases yield for robusta coffee farms in Vietnam

Byrareddy, Vivekananda and Kouadio, Louis ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-9669-7807 and Kath, Jarrod ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-2391-1264 and Mushtaq, Shahbaz and Rafiei, Vahid and Scobie, Michael and Stone, Roger (2020) Win-win: Improved irrigation management saves water and increases yield for robusta coffee farms in Vietnam. Agricultural Water Management, 241:106350. pp. 1-12. ISSN 0378-3774

[img]
Preview
Text (Accepted Version)
pagination_AGWAT_106350.pdf

Download (2MB) | Preview

Abstract

Robusta coffee is critically important for the economy and farmers of Vietnam, but also requires substantial irrigation leading to dwindling water resources. Developing clear recommendations for improved irrigation water management, while maintaining or increasing yield is therefore a key knowledge need for the coffee industry. We analyse 10-cropping-year data (2008/2009–2017/2018) of 558 farms across four major coffee-producing provinces in Vietnam’s Central Highlands using CROPWAT and hierarchical Bayesian modelling to (1) identify irrigation requirements under different climatic conditions, and (2) investigate the potential for improved irrigation management strategies. In average rainfall years the majority of farmers in Dak Nong and Lam Dong supplied an equivalent of 455–909 L tree−1 (assuming 1100 plants ha−1) with corresponding average yields ranging from 2149 to 3177 kg ha−1. In Dak Lak and Gia Lai the predominant range was equivalent to 1364–1818 L tree-1 (corresponding average yields: 2190 to 3203 kg ha−1). In dry years more water was supplied through irrigation at various levels depending on the province: varying between 1364–1818 L tree−1 in Dak Lak and Gia Lai, and 909–1364 L tree−1 in Dak Nong and Lam Dong. Our study also shows that irrigation water can be reduced by 273–536 L tree−1 (300–590 m3 ha−1) annually from the current levels in average rainfall years while still achieving average yield levels greater than 3000 kg ha−1. In dry years reductions of 27–218 L tree−1 (30–240 m3 ha−1) are possible. With adequate management of the key crop practices affecting coffee yields, substantial water savings at the provincial scale could be achieved. Thus, our findings could serve as a basis for province-specific irrigation water management in robusta coffee farms that will not only reduce overall water use, but also potentially maintain satisfactory yield levels.


Statistics for USQ ePrint 38880
Statistics for this ePrint Item
Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Institute for Life Sciences and the Environment - Centre for Applied Climate Sciences (1 Aug 2018 -)
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Institute for Advanced Engineering and Space Sciences - Centre for Agricultural Engineering (1 Aug 2018 -)
Date Deposited: 22 Jul 2020 05:52
Last Modified: 04 Jul 2021 22:05
Uncontrolled Keywords: Coffea canephora; climate variability; water management; sustainable agriculture
Fields of Research (2008): 07 Agricultural and Veterinary Sciences > 0701 Agriculture, Land and Farm Management > 070108 Sustainable Agricultural Development
07 Agricultural and Veterinary Sciences > 0701 Agriculture, Land and Farm Management > 070105 Agricultural Systems Analysis and Modelling
Fields of Research (2020): 30 AGRICULTURAL, VETERINARY AND FOOD SCIENCES > 3002 Agriculture, land and farm management > 300210 Sustainable agricultural development
30 AGRICULTURAL, VETERINARY AND FOOD SCIENCES > 3002 Agriculture, land and farm management > 300207 Agricultural systems analysis and modelling
Identification Number or DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.agwat.2020.106350
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/38880

Actions (login required)

View Item Archive Repository Staff Only