Most people think playing chess makes you ‘smarter’, but the evidence isn’t clear on that

Gardiner, Graeme and Ormsby, Gail and van der Laan, Luke ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-2275-8974 (2019) Most people think playing chess makes you ‘smarter’, but the evidence isn’t clear on that. The Conversation, 11 July 2019. pp. 1-7.

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Abstract

Chess has long been an important part of school culture. Many people believe chess has a range of cognitive benefits including improved memory, IQ, problem solving
skills and concentration.

But there is very little evidence supporting these conclusions. We conducted two studies (still unpublished) that found educators and parents believe chess has many
educational benefits. But children in our study who played chess did not show significant improvements in standardised test scores compared to children who didn’t play.


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Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: No
Item Status: Live Archive
Additional Information: Published version made available in accordance with Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0.
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Faculty of Business, Education, Law and Arts - School of Education (1 Jul 2019 -)
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Faculty of Business, Education, Law and Arts - School of Education (1 Jul 2019 -)
Date Deposited: 29 Apr 2020 05:54
Last Modified: 19 Jan 2021 23:24
Uncontrolled Keywords: chess; cognitive benefits
Fields of Research (2008): 13 Education > 1301 Education Systems > 130105 Primary Education (excl. Maori)
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/38612

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