Contagion and the Shakespearean stage

Chalk, Darryl and Floyd-Wilson, Mary (2019) Contagion and the Shakespearean stage. Palgrave Studies in Literature, Science and Medicine. Palgrave Macmillan Ltd., Cham, Switzerland. ISBN 978-3-030-14427-2


Abstract

This collection of essays considers what constituted contagion in the minds of early moderns in the absence of modern germ theory. In a wide range of essays focused on early modern drama and the culture of theatre, contributors explore how ideas of contagion not only inform representations of the senses (such as smell and touch) and emotions (such as disgust, pity, and shame) but also shape how people understood belief, narrative, and political agency. Epidemic thinking was not limited to medical inquiry or the narrow study of a particular disease. Shakespeare, Thomas Middleton, Ben Jonson, Thomas Dekker and other early modern writers understood that someone might be infected or transformed by the presence of others, through various kinds of exchange, or if exposed to certain ideas, practices, or environmental conditions. The discourse and concept of contagion provides a lens for understanding early modern theatrical performance, dramatic plots, and theatre-going itself.


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Item Type: Book (Commonwealth Reporting Category A)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Additional Information: Permanent restricted access to Front Matter in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher.
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Faculty of Business, Education, Law and Arts - School of Creative Arts (1 Mar 2019 -)
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Institute for Resilient Regions - Centre for Heritage and Culture (1 Aug 2018 -)
Date Deposited: 30 Jul 2020 08:43
Last Modified: 04 Jan 2021 00:21
Uncontrolled Keywords: Shakespeare, Shakespearean theatre, contagion, plague, history of emotions, the senses, early modern drama, germ theory
Fields of Research (2008): 20 Language, Communication and Culture > 2005 Literary Studies > 200524 Comparative Literature Studies
19 Studies in Creative Arts and Writing > 1904 Performing Arts and Creative Writing > 190404 Drama, Theatre and Performance Studies
Identification Number or DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-14428-9
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/38607

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