Effectiveness of interventions for reducing non-occupational sedentary behaviour in adults and older adults: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Shrestha, Nipun and Grgic, Jozo and Wiesner, Glen and Parker, Alexandra and Podnar, Hrvoje and Bennie, Jason A. and Biddle, Stuart J. H. and Pedisic, Zeljko (2019) Effectiveness of interventions for reducing non-occupational sedentary behaviour in adults and older adults: a systematic review and meta-analysis. British Journal of Sports Medicine, 53 (19). pp. 1206-1214. ISSN 0306-3674


Abstract

BACKGROUND: No systematic reviews of the effectiveness of interventions for reducing non-occupational sedentary behaviour are available. Therefore, the aim of this systematic review was to assess the effectiveness of interventions for reducing non-occupational sedentary behaviour in adults and older adults.

METHODS: An electronic search of nine databases was performed. Randomised controlled trials (RCT) and cluster RCTs among adults testing the effectiveness of interventions aimed to reduce non-occupational sedentary behaviour were considered for inclusion. Two review authors independently screened studies for eligibility, completed data extraction and assessed the risk of bias.

RESULTS: Nineteen studies that evaluated multicomponent lifestyle interventions, counselling or education, television (TV) control devices and workplace interventions were included. Evidence from the meta-analyses suggested that interventions can reduce leisure sitting time in adults in the medium term (-30 min/day; 95% CI -58 to -2), and TV viewing in the short term (-61 min/day; 95% CI -79 to -43) and medium term (-11 min/day; 95% CI -20 to -2). No significant pooled effects were found for transport sitting time, leisure-time computer use and longer term outcomes. No evidence was available on the effectiveness of interventions for reducing non-occupational sedentary time in older adults.

CONCLUSIONS: The findings of this systematic review suggest the interventions may be effective in reducing non-occupational sedentary behaviour in the short to medium term in adults. However, no significant effect was found on longer term outcomes. The quality of evidence was, however, low to very low. No evidence was available on the effectiveness of non-occupational interventions on reducing sedentary time in older adults. Further high-quality research with larger samples is warranted.


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Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Additional Information: Permanent restricted access to Published version, in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher.
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Historic - Institute for Resilient Regions - Centre for Health, Informatics and Economic Research (1 Aug 2018 - 31 Mar 2020)
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Historic - Institute for Resilient Regions - Centre for Health, Informatics and Economic Research (1 Aug 2018 - 31 Mar 2020)
Date Deposited: 20 Mar 2020 02:58
Last Modified: 27 Mar 2020 04:55
Uncontrolled Keywords: computer use, leisure sitting, transport sitting, TV viewing
Fields of Research (2008): 11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1117 Public Health and Health Services > 111712 Health Promotion
11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1117 Public Health and Health Services > 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
Identification Number or DOI: https://doi.org/10.1136/bjsports-2017-098270
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/38516

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