Is running associated with a lower risk of all-cause, cardiovascular and cancer mortality, and is the more the better? A systematic review and meta-analysis

Pedisic, Zeljko and Shrestha, Nipun and Kovalchik, Stephanie and Stamatakis, Emmanuel and Liangruenrom, Nucharapon and Grgic, Jozo and Titze, Sylvia and Biddle, Stuart J. H. ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-7663-6895 and Bauman, Adrian E. and Oja, Pekka (2020) Is running associated with a lower risk of all-cause, cardiovascular and cancer mortality, and is the more the better? A systematic review and meta-analysis. British Journal of Sports Medicine, 54 (15). pp. 898-905. ISSN 0306-3674


Abstract

Objective: To investigate the association of running participation and the dose of running with the risk of all-cause, cardiovascular and cancer mortality.

Design: Systematic review and meta-analysis.

Data sources: Journal articles, conference papers and doctoral theses indexed in Academic Search Ultimate, CINAHL, Health Source: Nursing/Academic Edition, MasterFILE Complete, Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations, Open Access Theses and Dissertations, PsycINFO, PubMed/MEDLINE, Scopus, SPORTDiscus and Web of Science.

Eligibility criteria for selecting studies: Prospective cohort studies on the association between running or jogging participation and the risk of all-cause, cardiovascular and/or cancer mortality in a non-clinical population of adults were included.

Results: Fourteen studies from six prospective cohorts with a pooled sample of 232 149 participants were included. In total, 25 951 deaths were recorded during 5.5-35 year follow-ups. Our meta-analysis showed that running participation is associated with 27%, 30% and 23% lower risk of all-cause (pooled adjusted hazard ratio (HR)=0.73; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.68 to 0.79), cardiovascular (HR=0.70; 95% CI 0.49 to 0.98) and cancer (HR=0.77; 95% CI 0.68 to 0.87) mortality, respectively, compared with no running. A meta-regression analysis showed no significant dose-response trends for weekly frequency, weekly duration, pace and the total volume of running.

Conclusion: Increased rates of participation in running, regardless of its dose, would probably lead to substantial improvements in population health and longevity. Any amount of running, even just once a week, is better than no running, but higher doses of running may not necessarily be associated with greater mortality benefits.


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Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Additional Information: Published online: 4 November 2019. Permanent restricted access to ArticleFirst version, in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher.
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Institute for Resilient Regions - Centre for Health Research (1 Apr 2020 -)
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Institute for Resilient Regions - Centre for Health Research (1 Apr 2020 -)
Date Deposited: 16 Mar 2020 01:29
Last Modified: 28 Apr 2021 03:07
Uncontrolled Keywords: exercise; physical activity; running; sport; survival
Fields of Research (2008): 11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1106 Human Movement and Sports Science > 110602 Exercise Physiology
Identification Number or DOI: https://doi.org/10.1136/bjsports-2018-100493
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/38057

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