The role of course development and design in an itinerant schooling program: the perceptions of staff members of the School of Distance Education in Brisbane, Queensland

Danaher, P. A. ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-2289-7774 and Wyer, D. W. and Rowan, L. O. and Hallinan, P. M. (1994) The role of course development and design in an itinerant schooling program: the perceptions of staff members of the School of Distance Education in Brisbane, Queensland. In: Joint Annual Conference of the International Council for Distance Education and 10th Annual Conference of the Distance Education Association of New Zealand, 8-12 May 1994, Wellington, New Zealand.

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Abstract

This paper examines the perceptions of teachers associated with the Brisbane School of Distance Education (Queensland, Australia), concerning their role in the establishment and implementation of a primary education program for children of the Showmen's Guild of Australasia. Interviews with five itinerant teachers revealed that their responsibilities include assessing correspondence papers from students and maintaining telephone contact with students, home tutors, and parents, as well as working in selected towns on a short-term basis to teach 'face-to-face' lessons to itinerant students. Each teacher worked with between 15 and 20 children, usually in family groups across grade levels. Teachers expressed concerns about the show children's lifestyle and how this has affected their educational and social development. However, all teachers felt that the distance education program had improved the children's educational opportunities and adequately addressed their educational needs. Disadvantages of the children's itinerant lifestyle that the program was unable to address were lack of routine, lack of continuity, dependence on the support of the home tutor, role conflicts of local teachers, and insufficient program funding. Implications for other itinerant education projects include recognizing the importance of teacher attitudes when implementing an educational program for a marginalized group. Contains 20 references. (LP)


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Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (Commonwealth Reporting Category E) (Paper)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Additional Information: No evidence of copyright restrictions preventing deposit of Published version.
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: No Faculty
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: No Faculty
Date Deposited: 13 May 2020 03:45
Last Modified: 13 May 2020 04:13
Uncontrolled Keywords: correspondence study, disadvantaged, distance education, educational needs, elementary education, foreign countries, itinerant teachers, life style, migrant children, migrant education, migrants, program effectiveness, teacher attitudes, teacher role
Fields of Research (2008): 13 Education > 1301 Education Systems > 130199 Education systems not elsewhere classified
13 Education > 1301 Education Systems > 130103 Higher Education
Fields of Research (2020): 39 EDUCATION > 3903 Education systems > 390399 Education systems not elsewhere classified
39 EDUCATION > 3903 Education systems > 390303 Higher education
Socio-Economic Objectives (2008): C Society > 93 Education and Training > 9301 Learner and Learning > 930199 Learner and Learning not elsewhere classified
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/37564

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