Marginalised identities, communications technologies and the politics of research: issues in interpreting the educational opportunities of the children of the Showmen's Guild of Australasia

Danaher, P. A. ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-2289-7774 (1993) Marginalised identities, communications technologies and the politics of research: issues in interpreting the educational opportunities of the children of the Showmen's Guild of Australasia. In: Signs and Power: the Politics of Communication Seminar, 21 Sept 1993, Rockhampton, Queensland, Australia.

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Abstract

This paper examines the link between language and power as it relates to program evaluation of the Brisbane School of Distance Education. This program was developed in 1989 to meet the educational needs of children who are part of the Showmen's Guild of Australasia. Guild members and their families travel from town to town putting on agricultural and equestrian shows. As part of program evaluation, interviews were conducted with parents, children, home tutors, and itinerant teachers. Interpretation of interview data was affected by relationships between the Showmen's Guild and the School of Distance Education, between the Guild and the researchers, and between the School and the researchers. It was found that in each relationship, language was used in an attempt to exercise power, by way of controlling the constructed identities that represent each group to 'the public'. Other noteworthy factors in these relationships include difficulties establishing communication among the three groups due to the mobility of Guild members, the ambiguous status of individuals within each group, and the coinciding and competing aspirations of researchers. Based on communication theories, this paper suggests that language reinforces the power to control responses of readers or listeners, that power is differentiated and mediated through language, and that all three groups involved in the study attempted to enhance their cultural capital and thereby become less marginalized in the wider community. (LP)


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Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (Commonwealth Reporting Category E) (Paper)
Refereed: No
Item Status: Live Archive
Additional Information: No evidence of copyright restrictions preventing deposit of Accepted version.
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: No Faculty
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: No Faculty
Date Deposited: 09 Mar 2020 06:40
Last Modified: 09 Mar 2020 06:40
Uncontrolled Keywords: communication (thought transfer), data interpretation, distance education, educational research, elementary education, foreign countries, group status, itinerant teachers, language usage, migrant children, migrant education, migrants, program evaluation, research problems, researcher subject relationship, researchers, Showmen's Guild of Australasia
Fields of Research : 13 Education > 1301 Education Systems > 130199 Education systems not elsewhere classified
13 Education > 1399 Other Education > 139999 Education not elsewhere classified
13 Education > 1301 Education Systems > 130105 Primary Education (excl. Maori)
Socio-Economic Objective: C Society > 93 Education and Training > 9399 Other Education and Training > 939999 Education and Training not elsewhere classified
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/37560

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