Review of tropical cyclones in the Australian region: Climatology, variability, predictability, and trends

Chand, Savin S. and Dowdy, Andrew J. and Ramsay, Hamish A. and Walsh, Kevin J. E. and Tory, Kevin J. and Power, Scott B. and Bell, Samuel S. and Lavender, Sally L. and Ye, Hua and Kuleshov, Yuri (2019) Review of tropical cyclones in the Australian region: Climatology, variability, predictability, and trends. WIREs Climate Change, 10 (5):e602. pp. 1-17. ISSN 1757-7780


Abstract

Tropical cyclones (TCs) can have severe impacts on Australia. These include extreme rainfall and winds, and coastal hazards such as destructive waves, storm surges, estuarine flooding, and coastal erosion. Various aspects of TCs in the Australian region have been documented over the past several decades. In recent years, increasing emphasis has been placed on human-induced climate change effects on TCs in the Australian region and elsewhere around the globe. However, large natural variability and the lack of consistent long-term TC observations have often complicated the detection and attribution of TC trends. Efforts have been made to improve TC records for Australia over the past decades, but it is still unclear whether such records are sufficient to provide better understanding of the impacts of natural climate variability and climate change. It is important to note that the damage costs associated with tropical cyclones in Australia have increased in recent decades and will continue to increase due to growing coastal settlement and infrastructure development. Therefore, it is critical that any coastal infrastructure planning and engineering decisions, as well as disaster management decisions, strongly consider future risks from tropical cyclones. A better understanding of tropical cyclones in a changing climate will provide key insights that can help mitigate impacts of tropical cyclones on vulnerable communities. An objective assessment of the Australian TCs at regional scale and its link with climate variability and change using improved and up-to-date data records is more imperative now than before.


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Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Additional Information: Files associated with this item cannot be displayed due to copyright restrictions.
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Institute for Life Sciences and the Environment - Centre for Applied Climate Sciences (1 Aug 2018 -)
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Institute for Life Sciences and the Environment - Centre for Applied Climate Sciences (1 Aug 2018 -)
Date Deposited: 30 Jan 2020 00:48
Last Modified: 26 Aug 2020 00:11
Uncontrolled Keywords: Australian region; climate change; natural variability; trends; tropical cyclones
Fields of Research (2008): 04 Earth Sciences > 0401 Atmospheric Sciences > 040102 Atmospheric Dynamics
04 Earth Sciences > 0401 Atmospheric Sciences > 040105 Climatology (excl.Climate Change Processes)
Identification Number or DOI: 10.1002/wcc.602
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/37557

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