Targeting management practices for rice yield gains in stress-prone environments of Myanmar

Radanielson, A. M. and Kato, Yoichiro and Palao, Leo Kris and Feyisa, Gudina and Malabayabas, Arlene Julia and Aunario, Jorrel K. and Garcia, Cornelia and Balanza, Jane G. and Win, Khin Thawda and Singh, Rakesh K. and Zamora, Chenie and Myint, Daw Tin Tin and Johnson, David E. (2019) Targeting management practices for rice yield gains in stress-prone environments of Myanmar. Field Crops Research, 244 (Article - 107631). pp. 1-12. ISSN 0378-4290

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Abstract

ice in Myanmar is grown in diverse environments, including inland dry zone and salt-affected coastal deltas. This study evaluated management options that could improve productivity and reduce risks of rice crop in stress-prone areas of the country. We selected four sites from two regions in the central dry zone (Wundwin) and the Ayeyarwady delta (Labutta, Bogale and Mawlamyinegyun). We used experimental and survey datasets on farmers’ practices and rice yields from 2012 to 2014 to run the ORYZA model to simulate the climatic yield potential (YP; yield without stress) and the attainable yield under rainfed conditions (YW; yield limited by water), saline conditions (YS; yield limited by salinity), and under conditions of current farmers’ practices (YF; yield in farmers’ practices). Simulated yield responses to different management practices showed spatial variability within and among the selected sites. YP ranged from 5.4 to 11.1 t ha−1, YW ranged from 0.5 to 7.5 t ha−1, and YF ranged from 2.2 to 4.2 t ha−1. In salt-affected areas, average YS ranged from less than 0.1 t ha-1 to 5.6 t ha−1. Yield gains with the choice of an improved variety and adjusted sowing date were estimated at up to 53% above YF. Changing the time of sowing and using improved rice varieties provided the greatest yield gains in salt-affected and drought-prone areas where YF was the least. In areas where YF was greater, the improvement of nitrogen management provided larger benefits than in areas with lower YF. We conclude that an integrated approach using remote-sensing technologies, crop modeling, and a geographic information system is valuable for targeting the best management options to close the yield gap in unfavorable rice environments in Asia.


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Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Additional Information: Accepted version embargoed until 1 Dec 2020 (12 months), and made not accessible.
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Institute for Life Sciences and the Environment - Centre for Sustainable Agricultural Systems (1 Aug 2018 -)
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Institute for Life Sciences and the Environment - Centre for Sustainable Agricultural Systems (1 Aug 2018 -)
Date Deposited: 03 Feb 2020 02:00
Last Modified: 09 Feb 2020 22:54
Uncontrolled Keywords: Climate; Cropping systems; Modeling; Productivity; Salinity; Soil
Fields of Research : 07 Agricultural and Veterinary Sciences > 0701 Agriculture, Land and Farm Management > 070104 Agricultural Spatial Analysis and Modelling
07 Agricultural and Veterinary Sciences > 0701 Agriculture, Land and Farm Management > 070103 Agricultural Production Systems Simulation
07 Agricultural and Veterinary Sciences > 0701 Agriculture, Land and Farm Management > 070105 Agricultural Systems Analysis and Modelling
Socio-Economic Objective: B Economic Development > 82 Plant Production and Plant Primary Products > 8203 Industrial Crops > 820399 Industrial Crops not elsewhere classified
D Environment > 96 Environment > 9603 Climate and Climate Change > 960301 Climate Change Adaptation Measures
Identification Number or DOI: 10.1016/j.fcr.2019.107631
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/37246

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