'I’m not doing that.' An in-depth examination of nonparticipation in mail-out bowel cancer screening programs

Goodwin, Belinda C. and March, Sonja and Crawford-Williams, Fiona and Chambers, Suzanne K. and Dunn, Jeff (2019) 'I’m not doing that.' An in-depth examination of nonparticipation in mail-out bowel cancer screening programs. Translational Behavioral Medicine. pp. 1-10.

Abstract

Despite a clear association between the early detection of bowel cancer and increased survival, participation in mail-out screening programs is poor. Several key barriers to participation have been identified, yet research has failed to examine the specific cognitions, actions, and individual contexts from which barriers emerge. The purpose of the current study was to gain a detailed understanding of the actual experience of kit receipt from the perspective of nonparticipants including their opinion on interventions that may be effective in promoting participation. Demographic differences in reasons for nonparticipation are also examined. Opt-out data from a national program was analyzed to detect demographic differences in reasons for nonparticipation. Qualitative interviews were conducted in a sample of “at risk” nonparticipants. Thematic analysis was conducted using an inductive phenomenological approach. Older, higher SES, male and previously screened participants were more likely to provide a medical reason for opting out of participation. Four key themes emerged from interview data. The first reflected intention; whereby participants were either intenders (i.e., they planned to participate) or refusers. Subsequent themes reflected practicalities, emotional reactions, and necessity. Differences between intenders and refusers within these themes as well as opinions regarding interventions were identified. Interventions involving interactions with health professionals, autonomous decision making, and those which emphasize the positive outcomes of screening may encourage refusers to participate in mail-out bowel cancer screening programs. Messages that reinforce the importance of screening or provide a practical reminder may be more useful for intenders.


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Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Additional Information: Files associated with this item cannot be displayed due to copyright restrictions.
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Faculty of Health, Engineering and Sciences - School of Psychology and Counselling (1 Jan 2015 -)
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Faculty of Health, Engineering and Sciences - School of Psychology and Counselling (1 Jan 2015 -)
Date Deposited: 24 Sep 2019 01:11
Last Modified: 29 Jan 2020 00:57
Fields of Research : 11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1112 Oncology and Carcinogenesis > 111299 Oncology and Carcinogenesis not elsewhere classified
17 Psychology and Cognitive Sciences > 1701 Psychology > 170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
Socio-Economic Objective: C Society > 92 Health > 9204 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) > 920401 Behaviour and Health
C Society > 92 Health > 9299 Other Health > 929999 Health not elsewhere classified
Identification Number or DOI: 10.1093/tbm/ibz096
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/37077

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