Understanding occupational sitting: prevalence, correlates and moderating effects in Australian employees

De Cocker, Katrien and Duncan, Mitch J. and Short, Camille and van Uffelen, Jannique G. Z. and Vandelanotte, Corneel (2014) Understanding occupational sitting: prevalence, correlates and moderating effects in Australian employees. Preventive Medicine, 67. pp. 288-94. ISSN 0091-7435


Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To (1) compare occupational sitting between different socio-demographic, health-related, work-related and psychosocial categories, (2) identity socio-demographic, health-related, work-related and psychosocial correlates of occupational sitting, and (3) examine the moderating effect of work-related factors in the relation between correlates and occupational sitting. METHODS: Randomly-selected Australian adults completed a web-based survey assessing socio-demographic (country of birth, gender, age, education, income), health-related (general health, weight, physical activity), work-related (employment status, occupational task, occupational classification) and sedentary-specific psychosocial (social norm, social support, self-efficacy, control, advantages, disadvantage, intention) factors, and occupational sitting-time. t-tests, ANOVAs and multiple linear regression analyses were conducted (in 2013) on a sample of employees (n=993). RESULTS: Respondents sat on average for 3.75 (SD=2.45) h/day during work. Investigated correlates explained 41% of the variance in occupational sitting. More occupational sitting was associated with being male, being younger, higher education and income, part-time and full-time employment, sedentary job tasks, white-collar/professional occupations, higher BMI, and perceiving more advantages of sitting less at work. Employment status and occupational classification moderated the association between control to sit less and occupational sitting. A lack of control to sit less was associated with higher occupational sitting in part-time and full-time workers, but not in casual workers; and in white-collar and professional workers, but not in blue-collar workers. CONCLUSIONS: Most important contributors to occupational sitting were work-related and socio-demographic correlates. More research is needed to confirm present results.


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Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Additional Information: Published version not displayed due to the copyright policy of the publisher.
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: No Faculty
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: No Faculty
Date Deposited: 16 Oct 2019 04:22
Last Modified: 16 Oct 2019 05:41
Uncontrolled Keywords: sedentary behaviour, cross-sectional study, workplace, online survey
Fields of Research (2008): 11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1117 Public Health and Health Services > 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1106 Human Movement and Sports Science > 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
Identification Number or DOI: 10.1016/j.ypmed.2014.07.031
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/37039

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