Cross-sectional associations between home environmental factors and domain-specific sedentary behaviors in adults: the moderating role of socio-demographic variables and BMI

Compernolle, Sofie and Busschaert, Cedric and De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse and Cardon, Greet and Chastin, Sebastien F. M. and Van Cauwenberg, Jelle and De Cocker, Katrien (2017) Cross-sectional associations between home environmental factors and domain-specific sedentary behaviors in adults: the moderating role of socio-demographic variables and BMI. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 14 (11 (1329)). pp. 1-12. ISSN 1661-7827

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Abstract

Despite the negative health effects of too much sitting, the majority of adults are too sedentary. To develop effective interventions, insight is needed into home environmental correlates of adults' sedentary behaviors, and into the susceptibility of population subgroups to these home environmental cues. In total, 559 Flemish adults reported socio-demographics, weight and height, home environmental factors and domain-specific sedentary behaviors. Generalized linear modeling was conducted to examine main associations between home environmental factors and domain-specific sedentary behaviors, and to test the moderating role of socio-demographics and BMI on these associations. In case of significant interactions, stratified analyses were performed. Results showed that, among those who did use a computer/laptop during the last week, a one-unit increase in the number of computers or laptops was associated with 17% (OR = 1.17; 95% CI = 1.02, 1.34) and 24% (OR = 1.24; 95% CI = 1.08, 1.43) more minutes computer time per day, respectively. The proximity of the remote controller (p < 0.001) and the number of televisions (p = 0.03) were positively associated with television time, and the number of motorized vehicles (95% CI = 0.001, 0.12) was positively associated with the odds of participation in transport-related sitting time. The latter two associations were moderated by BMI, with significant positive associations limited to those not overweight. To conclude, home environmental factors were associated with domain-specific sedentary behaviors, especially in healthy weight adults. If confirmed by longitudinal studies, public health professionals should encourage adults to limit the number of indoor entertainment devices and motorized vehicles.


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Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Additional Information: Published version made available in accordance with a Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0.
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: No Faculty
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: No Faculty
Date Deposited: 16 Oct 2019 05:09
Last Modified: 25 Oct 2019 05:26
Uncontrolled Keywords: context-specific sitting time; home environment; interaction; weight status
Fields of Research (2008): 11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1117 Public Health and Health Services > 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1106 Human Movement and Sports Science > 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
Fields of Research (2020): 42 HEALTH SCIENCES > 4299 Other health sciences > 429999 Other health sciences not elsewhere classified
42 HEALTH SCIENCES > 4207 Sports science and exercise > 420799 Sports science and exercise not elsewhere classified
Identification Number or DOI: https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph14111329
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/37018

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