Socio-ecological variables associated with context-specific sitting time in Belgian older adults: a one-year follow-up study

Busschaert, Cedric and Scherrens, Anne-Lore and De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse and Cardon, Greet and Van Cauwenberg, Jelle and De Cocker, Katrien (2016) Socio-ecological variables associated with context-specific sitting time in Belgian older adults: a one-year follow-up study. PLoS One, 11 (12 (0167881)). pp. 1-21.

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Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Knowledge about variables associated with context-specific sitting time in older adults is limited. Therefore, this study explored cross-sectional and longitudinal associations of socio-demographic, social-cognitive, physical-environmental and health-related variables with sitting during TV viewing, computer use and motorized transport in older adults. METHODS: A sample of Belgian older adults completed structured interviews on context-specific sitting time and associated variables using a longitudinal study design. Objective measurements of grip strength and physical performance were also completed. Complete baseline data were available of 258 participants (73.98+/-6.16 years) of which 229 participants remained in the study at one year follow-up (retention rate: 91.60%). Cross-sectional correlates (baseline data) and longitudinal predictors (change-scores in relation with change in sitting time) were explored through multiple linear regression analyses. RESULTS: Per context-specific sitting time, most of the cross-sectional correlates differed from the longitudinal predictors. Increases over time in enjoyment of watching TV (+one unit), encouragement of partner to watch less TV (+one unit) and TV time of partner (+30.0 min/day) were associated with respectively 9.1 min/day (p<0.001), 16.0 min/day (p<0.001) and 12.0 min/day (p<0.001) more sitting during TV viewing at follow-up. Increases over time in enjoyment of using a computer (+one unit), the number of smartphones and tablets (+1) and computer use of the partner (+30.0 min/day) were associated with respectively 5.5 min/day (p < .01), 10.4 min/day (p < .05) and 3.0 min/day (p < .05) more sitting during computer use at follow-up. An increase over time in self-efficacy regarding taking a bicycle or walking was associated with 2.9 min/day (p < .05) less sitting during motorized transport at follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: The results stressed the importance of looking at separate contexts of sitting. Further, the results highlighted the importance of longitudinal research in order to reveal which changes in particular variables predicted changes in context-specific sitting time. Variables at the social-cognitive level were most frequently related to context-specific sitting.


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Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Additional Information: Published version made available under a Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0.
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: No Faculty
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: No Faculty
Date Deposited: 01 Oct 2019 04:09
Last Modified: 29 Oct 2019 05:35
Uncontrolled Keywords: activities of daily living; aged; 80 and over; Belgium; cross-sectional studies; female; follow-up studies; humans; male; posture; socioeconomic factors
Fields of Research (2008): 11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1117 Public Health and Health Services > 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1106 Human Movement and Sports Science > 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
Identification Number or DOI: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0167881
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/37015

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