Tracking and predictors of screen time from early adolescence to early adulthood: a 10-year follow-up study

Busschaert, Cedric and Cardon, Greet and Van Cauwenberg, Jelle and Maes, Lea and Van Damme, Joris and Hublet, Anne and De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse and De Cocker, Katrien (2015) Tracking and predictors of screen time from early adolescence to early adulthood: a 10-year follow-up study. Journal of Adolescent Health, 56 (4). pp. 440-448. ISSN 1054-139X


Abstract

PURPOSE: To examine tracking of weekday and weekend screen time (ST; i.e., television [TV] and computer [PC] time) from early adolescence to early adulthood and to identify social ecological predictors of weekday and weekend ST among boys and girls separately. METHODS: Data were retrieved from elementary schools (n = 59) in Flanders (Belgium). At baseline, 1,957 children (age, 9.9 +/- .43 years) and one of the parents filled out a questionnaire on sedentary behavior and individual, social, and environmental variables. After a 10-year follow-up period, six hundred fifty-five 20-year-olds (age, 19.9 +/- .43 years) filled out an adapted questionnaire on sedentary behavior, of which 593 contained full data at baseline and follow-up. Multiple regressions were performed to examine predictors (baseline) of ST (follow-up), and logistic regressions were used to analyze tracking of ST. RESULTS: For boys, a consistent positive predictor of weekday and weekend TV and PC time at follow-up was ST at baseline (p < .01). For girls, drinking more soda at baseline predicted more weekday and weekend TV and PC time at follow-up (p </= .02). Some other individual variables also predicted ST in both boys and girls. Tracking was only found among boys; those exceeding the ST guideline at baseline were three to five times more likely to exceed this guideline at follow-up (p </= .001). Tracking was not present among girls. CONCLUSIONS: To minimize TV and PC time during early adulthood, interventions for adolescent boys should focus on minimizing ST. For girls, focus should be on healthy eating. However, more research is warranted to confirm these conclusions.


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Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Additional Information: Published version cannot be displayed due to copyright restrictions.
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: No Faculty
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: No Faculty
Date Deposited: 21 Oct 2019 05:04
Last Modified: 25 Feb 2020 01:18
Uncontrolled Keywords: tracking; predictors; screen time; young people; longitudinal study
Fields of Research (2008): 11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1117 Public Health and Health Services > 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1106 Human Movement and Sports Science > 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
Fields of Research (2020): 42 HEALTH SCIENCES > 4299 Other health sciences > 429999 Other health sciences not elsewhere classified
42 HEALTH SCIENCES > 4207 Sports science and exercise > 420799 Sports science and exercise not elsewhere classified
Identification Number or DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jadohealth.2014.11.016
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/37011

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