Editorial for special issue: Advances in sedentary behavior research and translation

Biddle, S. J. H. and Bennie, Jason (2017) Editorial for special issue: Advances in sedentary behavior research and translation. AIMS Public Health, 4 (1). pp. 33-37.

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Abstract

Sedentary behaviour—essentially low energy sitting time in waking hours—has emerged as an important topic in public health over the past decade or so. Although Morris and colleagues [1] analysed health outcomes of active versus seated occupations over 60 years ago, it was not until studies of TV viewing in children in the 1980s [2] that researchers started to recognise “too much sitting” as a potentially important health behaviour. Even then the rapid rise in the study of sedentary behaviour was not so evident until the early 2000s [3]–[5]. Studies on screen viewing (TV and computers), sitting at work and school, and sitting in cars have all emerged over this period, as well as a general recognition that high levels of sitting may have detrimental effects on health, and possibly be independent of levels of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA). In the past 10–15 years there has been an exponential increase in papers addressing sedentary behaviour from the perspective of sitting, noting that many exercise physiologists still use the word 'sedentary' incorrectly by referring to those not meeting a criterion level of “sufficient” physical activity.


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Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: No
Item Status: Live Archive
Additional Information: © 2017 Stuart J.H. Biddle and Jason Bennie, licensee AIMS Press. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0)
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Institute for Resilient Regions
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Institute for Resilient Regions
Date Deposited: 10 Mar 2020 02:53
Last Modified: 13 Mar 2020 07:05
Uncontrolled Keywords: physical activity, older adults, interventions, children, epidemiology, meta analysis, adolescents, science, youth, stand
Fields of Research (2008): 11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1117 Public Health and Health Services > 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1106 Human Movement and Sports Science > 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
Socio-Economic Objectives (2008): C Society > 92 Health > 9204 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) > 920499 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) not elsewhere classified
Identification Number or DOI: 10.3934/publichealth.2017.1.33
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/36634

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