Effect of stubble height management on perennial ryegrass, tall fescue, and chicory crown temperature

Langworthy, Adam D. and Rawnsley, Richard P. and Freeman, Mark J, and Corkrey, Ross and Harrison, Matthew T. and Pembleton, Kieth G. and Lane, Peter A. and Henry, David A. (2019) Effect of stubble height management on perennial ryegrass, tall fescue, and chicory crown temperature. Crop and Pasture Science, 70 (2). pp. 183-194. ISSN 1836-0947

[img] Text (Submitted version)
Langworthy_et_al_main_document_revised_CT.docx

Download (1MB)

Abstract

Defoliating pasture to shorter stubble heights (height above the soil surface) may increase temperature at the plant crown (plant–soil interface). This is especially relevant to summer C3 pasture production in parts of south-eastern Australia, where above-optimal ambient temperatures (≥30°C) are often recorded. A rainfed field experiment in north-west Tasmania, Australia, quantified the effect of stubble-height management on the upper distribution of crown temperatures (90th and 75th percentiles) experienced by three pasture species: perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.), tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.; syn. Schedonorus arundinaceus (Schreb.) Dumort.; syn. L. arundinaceum (Schreb.) Darbysh.), and chicory (Cichorium intybus L.). Three stubble-height treatment levels were evaluated: 35, 55 and 115 mm. Defoliation to shorter stubble heights (35 or 55 mm cf. 115 mm) increased the crown temperature of all species in the subsequent regrowth cycle (period between successive defoliation events). In the second summer, defoliating to shorter stubble heights increased the 90th percentile of crown temperature by an average of 4.2°C for perennial ryegrass, 3.6°C for tall fescue and 1.8°C for chicory. Chicory and second-year tall fescue swards experienced less-extreme crown temperatures than perennial ryegrass. This may partly explain why these two species often outyield perennial ryegrass in hotter summer environments than north-west Tasmania, and hence the increasing interest in their use.


Statistics for USQ ePrint 36561
Statistics for this ePrint Item
Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Additional Information: Submitted version made available in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher.
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Historic - Faculty of Health, Engineering and Sciences - School of Agricultural, Computational and Environmental Sciences (1 Jul 2013 - 5 Sep 2019)
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Historic - Faculty of Health, Engineering and Sciences - School of Agricultural, Computational and Environmental Sciences (1 Jul 2013 - 5 Sep 2019)
Date Deposited: 08 Oct 2019 05:48
Last Modified: 20 Nov 2019 05:56
Uncontrolled Keywords: defoliation severity, grazing intensity, grazing management, leaf area index, mechanical defoliation, residual height
Fields of Research (2008): 04 Earth Sciences > 0401 Atmospheric Sciences > 040104 Climate Change Processes
07 Agricultural and Veterinary Sciences > 0703 Crop and Pasture Production > 070302 Agronomy
07 Agricultural and Veterinary Sciences > 0703 Crop and Pasture Production > 070303 Crop and Pasture Biochemistry and Physiology
Fields of Research (2020): 37 EARTH SCIENCES > 3702 Climate change science > 370201 Climate change processes
30 AGRICULTURAL, VETERINARY AND FOOD SCIENCES > 3004 Crop and pasture production > 300403 Agronomy
30 AGRICULTURAL, VETERINARY AND FOOD SCIENCES > 3004 Crop and pasture production > 300404 Crop and pasture biochemistry and physiology
Socio-Economic Objectives (2008): B Economic Development > 83 Animal Production and Animal Primary Products > 8304 Pasture, Browse and Fodder Crops > 830406 Sown Pastures (excl. Lucerne)
Identification Number or DOI: https://doi.org/10.1071/CP18313
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/36561

Actions (login required)

View Item Archive Repository Staff Only