Automatic detection of pitching and throwing events in baseball with inertial measurement sensors

Murray, Nick B. and Black, Georgia M. and Whiteley, Rod J. and Gahan, Peter and Cole, Michael H. and Utting, Andy and Gabbett, Tim J. (2017) Automatic detection of pitching and throwing events in baseball with inertial measurement sensors. International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance, 12 (4). pp. 533-537. ISSN 15550265

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Abstract

PURPOSE: Throwing loads are known to be closely related to injury risk. However, for logistic reasons, typically only pitchers have their throws counted, and then only during innings. Accordingly, all other throws made are not counted, so estimates of throws made by players may be inaccurately recorded and underreported. A potential solution to this is the use of wearable microtechnology to automatically detect, quantify, and report pitch counts in baseball. This study investigated the accuracy of detection of baseball pitching and throwing in both practice and competition using a commercially available wearable microtechnology unit.

METHODS: Seventeen elite youth baseball players (mean +/- SD age 16.5 +/- 0.8 y, height 184.1 +/- 5.5 cm, mass 78.3 +/- 7.7 kg) participated in this study. Participants performed pitching, fielding, and throwing during practice and competition while wearing a microtechnology unit. Sensitivity and specificity of a pitching and throwing algorithm were determined by comparing automatic measures (ie, microtechnology unit) with direct measures (ie, manually recorded pitching counts).

RESULTS: The pitching and throwing algorithm was sensitive during both practice (100%) and competition (100%). Specificity was poorer during both practice (79.8%) and competition (74.4%).

CONCLUSIONS: These findings demonstrate that the microtechnology unit is sensitive to detect pitching and throwing events, but further development of the pitching algorithm is required to accurately and consistently quantify throwing loads using microtechnology.


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Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Additional Information: Accepted version deposited in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher.
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Institute for Resilient Regions
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Institute for Resilient Regions
Date Deposited: 03 Sep 2019 02:07
Last Modified: 10 Sep 2019 02:18
Uncontrolled Keywords: GPS, training, competition, workload monitoring
Fields of Research : 11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1106 Human Movement and Sports Science > 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
Identification Number or DOI: 10.1123/ijspp.2016-0212
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/36425

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