Playerload variables: sensitive to changes in direction and not related to collision workloads in rugby league match play

Hulin, Billy T. and Gabbett, Tim J. and Johnston, Rich D. and Jenkins, David G. (2018) Playerload variables: sensitive to changes in direction and not related to collision workloads in rugby league match play. International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance, 13 (9). pp. 1136-1142. ISSN 1555-0265

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Abstract

PURPOSE: To determine (1) how change-of-direction (COD) workloads influence PlayerLoad (PL) variables when controlling total distance covered and (2) relationships among collision workloads and PL variables during rugby league match play.

METHODS: Participants completed 3 protocols (crossover design) consisting of 10 repetitions of a 60-m effort in 15 s. The difference between protocols was the COD demands required to complete 1 repetition: no COD (straight line), 1 degrees x 180 degrees COD, or 3 degrees x 180 degrees COD. During rugby league matches, relationships among collision workloads, triaxial vector-magnitude PlayerLoad (PLVM), anteroposterior + mediolateral PL (PL2D), and PLVM accumulated at locomotor velocities below 2 m.s(-1) (ie, PLSLOW) were examined using Pearson correlations (r) with coefficients of determination (R(2)).

RESULTS: Comparing 3 degrees x 180 degrees COD to straight-line drills, PLVM.min(-1) (d = 1.50 +/- 0.49, large, likelihood = 100%, almost certainly), PL2D.min(-1) (d = 1.38 +/- 0.53, large, likelihood = 100%, almost certainly), and PLSLOW.min(-1) (d = 1.69 +/- 0.40, large, likelihood = 100%, almost certainly) were greater. Collisions per minute demonstrated a distinct (ie, R(2) < .50) relationship from PLVM.min(-1) (R(2) = .30, r = .55) and PL2D.min(-1) (R(2) = .37, r = .61). Total distance per minute demonstrated a very large relationship with PLVM.min(-1) (R(2) = .62, r = .79) and PL2D.min(-1) (R(2) = .57, r = .76).

CONCLUSIONS: PL variables demonstrate (1) large increases as COD demands intensify, (2) separate relationships from collision workloads, and (3) moderate to very large relationships with total distance during match play. PL variables should be used with caution to measure collision workloads in team sport.


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Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Additional Information: Accepted version deposited in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher.
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Institute for Resilient Regions
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Institute for Resilient Regions
Date Deposited: 03 Sep 2019 04:39
Last Modified: 10 Sep 2019 03:57
Uncontrolled Keywords: training load, monitoring, sport medicine
Fields of Research (2008): 11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1106 Human Movement and Sports Science > 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
Identification Number or DOI: 10.1123/ijspp.2017-0557
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/36411

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