Yes, rolling averages are a good way to assess training load for injury prevention. Is there a better way? Probably, but we have not seen the evidence

Drew, M. K. and Blanch, P. and Purdam, C. and Gabbett, T. J. (2017) Yes, rolling averages are a good way to assess training load for injury prevention. Is there a better way? Probably, but we have not seen the evidence. British Journal of Sports Medicine, 51 (7). pp. 618-619. ISSN 0306-3674


Abstract

The acute:chronic workload ratio (ACWR) is evidence based and is strongly supported by the available literature. Other models of injury risk have yet to show such support. We find the argument of the three hypothetical athletes presented by Menaspa to be reductionist and unrealistic. At no stage should the ACWR be examined in isolation of overall training structure. Furthermore, the way that athletes achieve their load is as important as the ACWR itself4 highlighting the sophistry of the comparison. Menaspa suggested that non-linear models are more appropriate, yet there is no evidence for the use of non-linear models in an injury prevention setting, and no evidence that they are superior to the current model. There may be better models for identifying links between training loads and injury; however, we are yet to see compelling evidence. The ACWR is currently a well-supported, evidence-based model.


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Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Additional Information: Permanent restricted access to ArticleFirst version, in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher.
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: No Faculty
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: No Faculty
Date Deposited: 13 Sep 2019 04:41
Last Modified: 06 Jan 2021 01:33
Uncontrolled Keywords: evidence based, injury prevention, training load
Fields of Research (2008): 11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1106 Human Movement and Sports Science > 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
Fields of Research (2020): 42 HEALTH SCIENCES > 4207 Sports science and exercise > 420799 Sports science and exercise not elsewhere classified
Identification Number or DOI: https://doi.org/10.1136/bjsports-2016-096609
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/36397

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