Sailing for Resilience: a Pilot Evaluation of Nature Therapy Program for Stress and Anxiety

Fein, Erich C. ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-4119-0130 and Tyquin, Dana and Mullens, Amy and Goldwater, Aaron and Gilmour, John (2019) Sailing for Resilience: a Pilot Evaluation of Nature Therapy Program for Stress and Anxiety. In: 2019 Australian Psychological Society College of Health Psychologists Conference, 25-27 April, 2019, Adelaide, Australia.


Abstract

Aim
The aim of the current study was to investigate the association of completing a 12-week long resilience sailing program, with participants’ experienced reduction in their stress levels and post-traumatic stress symptomology. These foci included predicting a reduction in re-experiencing the traumatic event, predicting a reduction in avoidance, predicting a reduction in negative alterations in cognition and mood and hypothesis, and predicting a reduction in alterations in arousal and reactivity.

Design
This research used a quasi-experimental time series design where participants were asked to provide data at three different time points (i.e. at the beginning, middle and end throughout the duration of the resilience sailing program).

Method
There were 7 participants recruited for the study, with 6 participants completing the program to date. All participants reported experience a traumatic event before registering with the program. The participants involved in the study were recruited in person by the researchers at the start of the sailing program. The study included 5 female participants and two male participants, ranging between 41 to 70 years of age, coming from a variety of social backgrounds and occupations, including one registered nurse, a police officer and two retirees.

Results
The Wilcoxon Matched-Pair Signed-Rank Test was conducted on the sample dataset to investigate changes in scores between three different time-points. From time point 1 to time point 3, significant negative differences were found for all PTSD criteria, that being re-experiencing (z = -2.00, p = .046), avoidance (z = -2.20, p = .03), NACM (z = -2.21, p = .03) and ARRT (z = -2.00, p = .46). From time point 1 to time point 3, significant negative differences were again found for all PTSD criteria, that being re-experiencing (z = -2.00, p = .046), avoidance (z = -2.20, p = .03), NACM (z = -2.21, p = .03) and ARRT (z = -2.00, p = .46).

Conclusion
Research and evaluation of nature therapy interventions are in their infancy, both worldwide and in Australia. However, this pilot research suggests that nature therapy program may provide a novel means of de-escalating stress and anxiety symptoms after individuals experience traumatic events.


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Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (Commonwealth Reporting Category E) (Poster)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Faculty of Health, Engineering and Sciences - School of Psychology and Counselling (1 Jan 2015 -)
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Faculty of Health, Engineering and Sciences - School of Psychology and Counselling (1 Jan 2015 -)
Date Deposited: 07 Aug 2020 01:20
Last Modified: 01 Oct 2020 00:22
Uncontrolled Keywords: post-traumatic stress; nature therapy; sailing
Fields of Research (2008): 17 Psychology and Cognitive Sciences > 1701 Psychology > 170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/36346

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