Candida albicans colonisation, continence status and incontinence-associated dermatitis in the acute care setting: a pilot study

Campbell, Jill L. and Coyer, Fiona M. and Mudge, Alison M. and Robertson, Ivan M. and Osborne, Sonya R. (2016) Candida albicans colonisation, continence status and incontinence-associated dermatitis in the acute care setting: a pilot study. International Wound Journal, 14 (3). pp. 488-495. ISSN 1742-4801

Abstract

Candida albicans is the most prevalent human fungal commensal organism and is reported to be the most frequent aetiological organism responsible for infection associated with incontinence-associated dermatitis. However, it remains unclear whether incontinence predisposes a patient to increased Candida colonisation or whether incontinence acts as a trigger for Candida infection in those already colonised. The purpose of this observational cross-sectional study was to estimate colonisation rates of C. albicans in continent, compared to incontinent patients, and patients with incontinence-associated dermatitis. Data were collected on 81 inpatients of a major Australian hospital and included a pelvic skin inspection and microbiological specimens to detect C. Albicans at hospital admission. The mean age of the sample was 76 years (SD=12.22) with 53% being male. Incontinent participants (n=53) had a non-significant trend towards greater Candida colonisation rates at the perianal site (43% versus 28%).


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Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Additional Information: Published version cannot be displayed due to copyright restrictions.
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Faculty of Health, Engineering and Sciences - School of Nursing and Midwifery
Date Deposited: 15 Jul 2019 03:58
Last Modified: 10 Sep 2019 03:06
Uncontrolled Keywords: Candida albicans; colonisation; incontinence; incontinence-associated dermatitis; cross-sectional study
Fields of Research : 11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1110 Nursing > 111003 Clinical Nursing: Secondary (Acute Care)
Socio-Economic Objective: E Expanding Knowledge > 97 Expanding Knowledge > 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
Identification Number or DOI: 10.1111/iwj.12630
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/36032

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