Can the neighbourhood built environment make a difference to children’s development? Building the research agenda to create evidence for place-based children’s policy

Villanueva, Karen and Badland, Hannah and Kvalsvig, Amanda and O'Connor, Meredith and Christian, Hayley and Woolcock, Geoffrey and Giles-Corti, Billie and Goldfeld, Sharon (2016) Can the neighbourhood built environment make a difference to children’s development? Building the research agenda to create evidence for place-based children’s policy. Academic Pediatrics, 16 (1). pp. 10-19. ISSN 1876-2859

Abstract

Healthy child development is determined by a combination of physical, social, family, individual, and environmental factors. Thus far, the majority of child development research has focused on the influence of individual, family, and school environments and has largely ignored the neighborhood context despite the increasing policy interest. Yet given that neighborhoods are the locations where children spend large periods of time outside of home and school, it is plausible the physical design of neighborhoods (built environment), including access to local amenities, can affect child development. The relatively few studies exploring this relationship support associations between child development and neighborhood destinations, green spaces, interaction with nature, traffic exposure, and housing density. These studies emphasize the need to more deeply understand how child development outcomes might be influenced by the neighborhood built environment. Pursuing this research space is well aligned with the current global movements on livable and child-friendly cities. It has direct public policy impact by informing planning policies across a range of sectors (urban design and planning, transport, public health, and pediatrics) to implement place-based interventions and initiatives that target children’s health and development at the community level. We argue for the importance of exploring the effect of the neighborhood built environment on child development as a crucial first step toward informing urban design principles to help reduce developmental vulnerability in children and to set optimal child development trajectories early.


Statistics for USQ ePrint 35704
Statistics for this ePrint Item
Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Additional Information: Published version cannot be displayed due to copyright restrictions
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Institute for Resilient Regions
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Institute for Resilient Regions
Date Deposited: 06 Nov 2019 05:03
Last Modified: 20 Nov 2019 05:15
Uncontrolled Keywords: built environment, child development, neighborhood, physical environment, place-based, policy
Fields of Research : 11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1117 Public Health and Health Services > 111704 Community Child Health
Socio-Economic Objective: C Society > 92 Health > 9205 Specific Population Health (excl. Indigenous Health) > 920501 Child Health
Funding Details:
Identification Number or DOI: 10.1016/j.acap.2015.09.006
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/35704

Actions (login required)

View Item Archive Repository Staff Only