Analysis of agriculture-related life-threatening injuries presenting to emergency departments of rural generalist hospitals in Southern Queensland

Pinidiyapathirage, Janani and Kitchener, Scott and McNamee, Sarah and Wynter, Sacha and Langford, Jack and Doyle, Ashley and McMahon, Andrew (2018) Analysis of agriculture-related life-threatening injuries presenting to emergency departments of rural generalist hospitals in Southern Queensland. Emergency Medicine Australasia, 30 (6). ISSN 1742-6731

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Abstract

Objective: Agricultural industries are among the most dangerous in Australia posing significant public health risks.This study analyses the nature and management of agriculture-related injuries presenting to EDs in selected hospitals in Southern Queensland.

Methods: Data on agricultural injury presentations over a 6 month period was collected at four rural hospitals by a dedicated onsite hospital data coordinator. Additionally, in two of the participating hospitals all injury presentations over the same 6 month period were recorded. A pre-tested survey instrument, modified for rural settings and designed and developed to export the abstracted data using an iPad application was used as the survey tool.

Results: The incidence of agriculture related injuries was 11% of all injuries, most were males (73%), averaging 40 years. On presentation, 66.5% (n = 234) were categorised as imminently or potentially life threatening with 44% of those patients presenting to hospital ED >3 h after the injury. Large animals were more commonly reported as involved in the aetiology of the presenting injury, particularly using horses and handling cattle.

Conclusions: Agricultural injuries are a significant group of primary care presentations to rural hospitals and training and resourcing for rural hospitals
should reflect this. A better understanding of common injury types can lead to efficient allocation of available resources in rural hospitals and
potentially improve ED practices. The delay in presentation must be considered in response planning both by farmers and hospital EDs.


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Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Additional Information: Published online: 11 December 2018. Permament restricted access to ArticleFirst version, in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Historic - Institute for Agriculture and the Environment
Date Deposited: 12 Dec 2018 02:34
Last Modified: 14 Jan 2019 22:38
Uncontrolled Keywords: agricultural injuries, farmers, injury prevention, Queensland
Fields of Research : 11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1117 Public Health and Health Services > 111705 Environmental and Occupational Health and Safety
11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1117 Public Health and Health Services > 111706 Epidemiology
Socio-Economic Objective: C Society > 92 Health > 9204 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) > 920409 Injury Control
C Society > 92 Health > 9204 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) > 920412 Preventive Medicine
Identification Number or DOI: 10.1111/1742-6723.13215
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/35250

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