How women executives survive the isolated echelons of the corporate ladder

Waldron, Ainslie and Southey, Kim and Murray, Peter A. (2018) How women executives survive the isolated echelons of the corporate ladder. In: Work and identity: contemporary perspectives on workplace diversity. Palgrave Explorations in Workplace Stigma. Palgrave Macmillan Ltd., United Kingdom, pp. 85-99. ISBN 978-3-319-73935-9

Abstract

Using status characteristics theory (SCT) as its premise, this chapter provides insights and advice to aspiring executives, drawn from the experiences of women who have achieved either executive-level positions or board memberships in Australia. This investigation reveals that the small number of women working at the executive level means that these women do not benefit from the male camaraderie found in highly active boys’ clubs. Consequently, in their relative solitude, they develop strategies and behaviours to contend with unpalatable issues of enigmatic organisational policies, excessive performance scrutiny, aggressive competition from other women, as well as both overt and unconscious discrimination. Limited research exists on the experience of Australian executive women leaders, although it is anticipated that their advice is ultimately relevant to women (and men) working at any level, in any type of organisation, worldwide.


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Item Type: Book Chapter (Commonwealth Reporting Category B)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Additional Information: Restricted access to published version in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher.
Faculty / Department / School: Current - Faculty of Business, Education, Law and Arts - School of Management and Enterprise
Date Deposited: 28 May 2018 04:55
Last Modified: 19 Sep 2018 03:52
Uncontrolled Keywords: status, women, executive women, discrimination, boys' club
Fields of Research : 15 Commerce, Management, Tourism and Services > 1503 Business and Management > 150310 Organisation and Management Theory
15 Commerce, Management, Tourism and Services > 1503 Business and Management > 150305 Human Resources Management
Socio-Economic Objective: B Economic Development > 91 Economic Framework > 9104 Management and Productivity > 910402 Management
Identification Number or DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-73936-6
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/34083

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