Participant characteristics of users of holistic movement practices in Australia

Vergeer, Ineke and Bennie, Jason A. and Charity, Melanie J. and van Uffelen, Jannique G.Z. and Harvey, Jack T. and Biddle, Stuart J.H. and Eime, Rochelle M. (2018) Participant characteristics of users of holistic movement practices in Australia. Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, 31. pp. 181-187. ISSN 1744-3881

Abstract

Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare the characteristics of users of holistic movement practices in Australia to people who were physically active but not using holistic movement practices. A second aim was to compare characteristics of users of specific holistic movement practices (yoga/Pilates and t'ai chi/qigong).

Design: We performed a secondary data analysis on pooled data of a nationally-representative physical activity survey conducted yearly 2001e2010 (n = 195,926).

Setting: Australia-wide Exercise, Recreation, and Sport Survey (ERASS).

Main outcome measures: A range of socio-demographic and participation characteristics were documented and compared between users and non-users of holistic movement practices and between yoga/Pilates and t'ai chi/qigong users, employing descriptive statistics, chi square, and multiple logistic regression analyses.

Results: Users of holistic movement practices (n = 6826) were significantly more likely than non-users to be female, older, have fewer children at home, and have higher levels of education, socio-economic background, and physical activity involvement (p < 0.001). Yoga/Pilates (n = 5733) and t'ai chi/qigong (n = 947) users were also found to differ on a number of characteristics, including age, sex, socioeconomic background, and marital status.

Conclusion: As a group, Australian users of holistic movement practices differ on a range of characteristics from those Australians active in other types of physical activities. However, differences between yoga/Pilates and t'ai chi/qigong users suggest these practices attract somewhat different subpopulations. To what extent these differences are due to characteristics inherent to the practices themselves or to differences in delivery-related parameters needs to be examined in future research.


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Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Additional Information: Restricted access to published version in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher.
Faculty / Department / School: Current - Institute for Resilient Regions
Date Deposited: 17 May 2018 06:34
Last Modified: 21 May 2018 00:31
Uncontrolled Keywords: holistic; mind-body; participation correlates; participation determinants; yoga; tai chi; qigong; Pilates
Fields of Research : 11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1104 Complementary and Alternative Medicine > 110499 Complementary and Alternative Medicine not elsewhere classified
11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1117 Public Health and Health Services > 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1106 Human Movement and Sports Science > 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
Socio-Economic Objective: C Society > 92 Health > 9204 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) > 920499 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) not elsewhere classified
Identification Number or DOI: 10.1016/j.ctcp.2018.02.011
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/34067

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