Participant characteristics of users of holistic movement practices in Australia

Vergeer, Ineke ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-6560-9023 and Bennie, Jason A. ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-8668-8998 and Charity, Melanie J. and van Uffelen, Jannique G. Z. and Harvey, Jack T. and Biddle, Stuart J. H. ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-7663-6895 and Eime, Rochelle M. (2018) Participant characteristics of users of holistic movement practices in Australia. Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, 31. pp. 181-187. ISSN 1744-3881

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Abstract

Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare the characteristics of users of holistic movement practices in Australia to people who were physically active but not using holistic movement practices. A second aim was to compare characteristics of users of specific holistic movement practices (yoga/Pilates and t'ai chi/qigong).

Design: We performed a secondary data analysis on pooled data of a nationally-representative physical activity survey conducted yearly 2001e2010 (n = 195,926).

Setting: Australia-wide Exercise, Recreation, and Sport Survey (ERASS).

Main outcome measures: A range of socio-demographic and participation characteristics were documented and compared between users and non-users of holistic movement practices and between yoga/Pilates and t'ai chi/qigong users, employing descriptive statistics, chi square, and multiple logistic regression analyses.

Results: Users of holistic movement practices (n = 6826) were significantly more likely than non-users to be female, older, have fewer children at home, and have higher levels of education, socio-economic background, and physical activity involvement (p < 0.001). Yoga/Pilates (n = 5733) and t'ai chi/qigong (n = 947) users were also found to differ on a number of characteristics, including age, sex, socioeconomic background, and marital status.

Conclusion: As a group, Australian users of holistic movement practices differ on a range of characteristics from those Australians active in other types of physical activities. However, differences between yoga/Pilates and t'ai chi/qigong users suggest these practices attract somewhat different subpopulations. To what extent these differences are due to characteristics inherent to the practices themselves or to differences in delivery-related parameters needs to be examined in future research.


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Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Additional Information: Accepted version deposited in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher.
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Institute for Resilient Regions
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: Current - Institute for Resilient Regions
Date Deposited: 17 May 2018 06:34
Last Modified: 10 Mar 2020 02:04
Uncontrolled Keywords: holistic; mind-body; participation correlates; participation determinants; yoga; tai chi; qigong; Pilates
Fields of Research (2008): 11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1104 Complementary and Alternative Medicine > 110499 Complementary and Alternative Medicine not elsewhere classified
11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1117 Public Health and Health Services > 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1106 Human Movement and Sports Science > 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
Socio-Economic Objectives (2008): C Society > 92 Health > 9204 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) > 920499 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) not elsewhere classified
Identification Number or DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ctcp.2018.02.011
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/34067

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