Beliefs and attitudes: Hepatitis B among Sub-Saharan African migrants living in Queensland

Majerovic, Ashleigh (2016) Beliefs and attitudes: Hepatitis B among Sub-Saharan African migrants living in Queensland. Honours thesis, University of Southern Queensland. (Unpublished)

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Abstract

Hepatitis B (HBV) is a blood born virus that is becoming an increasing health burden worldwide. It is estimated that up to 50% of people who have HBV are unaware they are
infected. This is concerning, as this lack of awareness prevents people from receiving medical treatment for HBV as well as taking the appropriate action to prevent transmission of the disease to others. A particular target group whom have higher rates of HBV are people from Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CALD) backgrounds. In particular, migrants from Sub-Saharan African countries are most vulnerable, due to high rates of infection. This
study aimed to identify beliefs and attitudes regarding HBV, gaps in health literacy, as well as HBV vaccination and testing rates among migrants from Sub-Saharan Africa in
Queensland. This was conducted through quantitative cross-sectional surveys. The study replicated the methodology and compare the findings to studies conducted in QLD about selfreported knowledge of HBV in CALD communities. Findings show a link between health literacy and health-protective behaviours. Future research is needed to further explore these findings.


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Item Type: Thesis (Non-Research) (Honours)
Item Status: Live Archive
Additional Information: Bachelor of Science (Honours) thesis, majoring in Psychology.
Faculty / Department / School: Current - Faculty of Health, Engineering and Sciences - School of Psychology and Counselling
Supervisors: Mullens, Amy; Fein, Erich
Date Deposited: 06 Mar 2018 06:15
Last Modified: 06 Mar 2018 06:15
Uncontrolled Keywords: Hepatitis B, Sub-Saharan Africa, health promotion, self-reported knowledge, health literacy
Fields of Research : 11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1117 Public Health and Health Services > 111712 Health Promotion
11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1103 Clinical Sciences > 110309 Infectious Diseases
17 Psychology and Cognitive Sciences > 1701 Psychology > 170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/33828

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