Multi-household grazing management pattern maintains better soil fertility

Cao, Jianjun and Xu, Xueyun and Deo, Ravinesh C. and Holden, Nicholas M. and Adamowski, Jan F. and Gong, Yifan and Feng, Qi and Yang, Shurong and Li, Mengtian and Zhou, Junju and Zhang, Jian and Liu, Minxia (2018) Multi-household grazing management pattern maintains better soil fertility. Agronomy for Sustainable Development, 38 (6). pp. 1-7. ISSN 1774-0746

Abstract

In addition to changes in land use and cover, changes in land management pattern can also have a significant effect on soil fertility. However, to date, changes in grassland grazing management pattern caused by policies have received less attention in terms of their impact on soil fertility. In this paper, we investigated the influence of two different grazing management patterns: the multi-household grazing management pattern (consisting of pastures managed by two or more households with no fences separating them) and the single-household grazing pattern (with fences between adjacent pastures managed by different households), which were implemented after the enactment of grassland contract policy, on soil fertility in the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau. Our hypothesis was that soil fertility differed between the two grazing management patterns. We selected five study sites with both grazing management patterns in Maqu County on the eastern Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau and sampled 30 winter grasslands from each grazing management pattern to explore differences in soil organic carbon, soil total nitrogen, and soil total phosphorus. We showed that these indicators of fertility status were significantly greater under the multi-household grazing management pattern (47 g C kg−1, 4.6 g N kg−1, and 0.77 g P kg−1) compared to the single-household grazing management pattern (43 g C kg−1, 4.3 g N kg−1, and 0.73 g P kg−1). This is the first study of the effects of grazing management pattern on soil fertility in this environment, and it indicated that the multi-household grazing management pattern could maintain better soil fertility and help to support sustainable use of these grasslands.


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Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Additional Information: Published online: 3 Jan 2018. Permanent restricted access to ArticleFirst version, in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Dr. R C Deo thanks the CAS Presidential International Fellowship Initiative Program and the University of Southern Queensland Academic Development and Outside Studies Program (2016) for research funding.
Faculty / Department / School: Current - Faculty of Health, Engineering and Sciences - School of Agricultural, Computational and Environmental Sciences
Date Deposited: 08 Jan 2018 03:09
Last Modified: 14 May 2018 03:51
Uncontrolled Keywords: pastoral lifestyles; grassland contract policy; multi-household grazing management pattern; single-household grazing management; pattern; trampling; maqu county
Fields of Research : 07 Agricultural and Veterinary Sciences > 0701 Agriculture, Land and Farm Management > 070108 Sustainable Agricultural Development
07 Agricultural and Veterinary Sciences > 0701 Agriculture, Land and Farm Management > 070106 Farm Management, Rural Management and Agribusiness
07 Agricultural and Veterinary Sciences > 0701 Agriculture, Land and Farm Management > 070107 Farming Systems Research
07 Agricultural and Veterinary Sciences > 0701 Agriculture, Land and Farm Management > 070101 Agricultural Land Management
Socio-Economic Objective: D Environment > 96 Environment > 9607 Environmental Policy, Legislation and Standards > 960705 Rural Land Policy
D Environment > 96 Environment > 9607 Environmental Policy, Legislation and Standards > 960704 Land Stewardship
E Expanding Knowledge > 97 Expanding Knowledge > 970107 Expanding Knowledge in the Agricultural and Veterinary Sciences
Identification Number or DOI: 10.1007/s13593-017-0482-2
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/33539

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