Total and domain-specific sitting time among employees in desk-based work settings in Australia

Bennie, Jason A. ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-8668-8998 and Pedisic, Zeljko and Timperio, Anna and Crawford, David and Dunstan, David and Bauman, Adrian and van Uffelen, Jannique and Salmon, Jo (2015) Total and domain-specific sitting time among employees in desk-based work settings in Australia. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 39 (3). pp. 237-242. ISSN 1326-0200

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Abstract

Objective: To describe the total and domain-specific daily sitting time among a sample of Australian office-based employees.

Methods: In April 2010, paper-based surveys were provided to desk-based employees (n=801) in Victoria, Australia. Total daily and domain-specific (work, leisure-time and transport-related) sitting time (minutes/day) were assessed by validated questionnaires. Differences in sitting time were examined across socio-demographic (age, sex, occupational status) and lifestyle characteristics (physical activity levels, body mass index [BMI]) using multiple linear regression analyses.

Results: The median (95% confidence interval [CI]) of total daily sitting time was 540 (531–557) minutes/day. Insufficiently active adults (median=578 minutes/day, [95%CI: 564–602]), younger adults aged 18–29 years (median=561 minutes/day, [95%CI: 540–577]) reported the highest total daily sitting times. Occupational sitting time accounted for almost 60% of total daily sitting time. In multivariate analyses, total daily sitting time was negatively associated with age (unstandardised regression coefficient [B]=−1.58, p<0.001) and overall physical activity (minutes/week) (B=−0.03, p<0.001) and positively associated with BMI (B=1.53, p=0.038).

Conclusions: Desk-based employees reported that more than half of their total daily sitting time was accrued in the work setting.

Implications: Given the high contribution of occupational sitting to total daily sitting time among desk-based employees, interventions should focus on the work setting.


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Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Additional Information: Files associated with this item cannot be displayed due to copyright restrictions.
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: No Faculty
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: No Faculty
Date Deposited: 20 Nov 2017 07:06
Last Modified: 23 Nov 2017 02:49
Uncontrolled Keywords: sitting; physical activity; epidemiology; employees; workplace
Fields of Research (2008): 11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1106 Human Movement and Sports Science > 110602 Exercise Physiology
Socio-Economic Objectives (2008): C Society > 92 Health > 9205 Specific Population Health (excl. Indigenous Health) > 920505 Occupational Health
Identification Number or DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/1753-6405.12293
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/33338

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