Self-beliefs: strong correlates of mathematics achievement and intelligence

Stankov, Lazar and Lee, Jihyun (2017) Self-beliefs: strong correlates of mathematics achievement and intelligence. Intelligence, 61. pp. 11-16. ISSN 1042-4296

Abstract

In this paper we summarize recent findings from large-scale international surveys (PISA and TIMSS) of relevance to the predictability gradient hypothesis (Stankov, 2013). Non-cognitive measures are divided into two groups on the basis of their correlation with mathematics achievement. Many have low (r < 0.20) correlations. The best predictors of cognitive performance are a cluster of self-beliefs consisting of confidence, self-efficacy, anxiety, and self-concept. These appear to be the most potent influences underpinning Cattell's (1987) investment theory of fluid and crystallized intelligence. Self-beliefs affect cognitive performance either as impediments (anxiety) or facilitators (good calibration of self-efficacy and confidence). This information about the role of self-beliefs can inform future efforts at intervention.


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Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Additional Information: Published version cannot be displayed due to copyright restrictions.
Faculty / Department / School: No Faculty
Date Deposited: 07 Aug 2017 04:49
Last Modified: 22 Jun 2018 04:41
Uncontrolled Keywords: anxiety; confidence; investment theory; predictability gradient; self-efficacy
Fields of Research : 17 Psychology and Cognitive Sciences > 1799 Other Psychology and Cognitive Sciences > 179999 Psychology and Cognitive Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio-Economic Objective: E Expanding Knowledge > 97 Expanding Knowledge > 970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
Identification Number or DOI: 10.1016/j.intell.2016.12.001
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/32821

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