Spikes in acute workload are associated with increased injury risk in elite cricket fast bowlers

Hulin, Billy T. and Gabbett, Tim J. and Blanch, Peter and Chapman, Paul and Bailey, David and Orchard, John W. (2014) Spikes in acute workload are associated with increased injury risk in elite cricket fast bowlers. British Journal of Sports Medicine, 48 (8). pp. 708-712. ISSN 0306-3674

Abstract

Objective: To determine if the comparison of acute and chronic workload is associated with increased injury risk in elite cricket fast bowlers. Methods: Data were collected from 28 fast bowlers who completed a total of 43 individual seasons over a 6-year period. Workloads were estimated by summarising the total number of balls bowled per week (external workload), and by multiplying the session rating of perceived exertion by the session duration (internal workload). One-week data (acute workload), together with 4-week rolling average data (chronic workload), were calculated for external and internal workloads. The size of the acute workload in relation to the chronic workload provided either a negative or positive trainingstress balance. Results: A negative training-stress balance was associated with an increased risk of injury in the week after exposure, for internal workload (relative risk (RR) =2.2 (CI 1.91 to 2.53), p=0.009), and external workload (RR=2.1 (CI 1.81 to 2.44), p=0.01). Fast bowlers with an internal workload training-stress balance of greater than 200% had a RR of injury of 4.5 (CI 3.43 to 5.90, p=0.009) compared with those with a training-stress balance between 50% and 99%. Fast bowlers with an external workload training-stress balance of more than 200% had a RR of injury of 3.3 (CI 1.50 to 7.25, p=0.033) in comparison to fast bowlers with an external workload training-stress balance between 50% and 99%. Conclusions: These findings demonstrate that large increases in acute workload are associated with increased injury risk in elite cricket fast bowlers.


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Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Additional Information: Published version cannot be displayed due to copyright restrictions.
Faculty / Department / School: No Faculty
Date Deposited: 01 Jun 2017 01:56
Last Modified: 01 Jun 2017 01:56
Uncontrolled Keywords: adult; athletic injuries; exercise; humans; male; New South Wales; risk factors; stress, physiological; track and field; Victoria; workload
Fields of Research : 11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1106 Human Movement and Sports Science > 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
Socio-Economic Objective: C Society > 92 Health > 9299 Other Health > 929999 Health not elsewhere classified
Identification Number or DOI: 10.1136/bjsports-2013-092524
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/32322

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