High training workloads alone do not cause sports injuries: how you get there is the real issue [Editorial]

Gabbett, Tim J. and Hulin, Billy T. and Blanch, Peter and Whiteley, Rod (2016) High training workloads alone do not cause sports injuries: how you get there is the real issue [Editorial]. British Journal of Sports Medicine, 50 (8). pp. 444-445. ISSN 0306-3674


Abstract

Clinicians or strength and conditioning professionals who prescribe training workloads aim for workloads that are high enough to improve fitness (ie, performance), but not so high as to risk injury. At the extremes, no training results in an unprepared athlete, whereas an overuse injury is, by definition, an error in training prescription.


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Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Additional Information: Files associated with this item cannot be displayed due to copyright restrictions.
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: No Faculty
Faculty/School / Institute/Centre: No Faculty
Date Deposited: 17 May 2017 05:47
Last Modified: 06 Jan 2021 01:37
Uncontrolled Keywords: injury prevention
Fields of Research (2008): 11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1106 Human Movement and Sports Science > 110604 Sports Medicine
Fields of Research (2020): 32 BIOMEDICAL AND CLINICAL SCIENCES > 3202 Clinical sciences > 320225 Sports medicine
Socio-Economic Objectives (2008): C Society > 92 Health > 9299 Other Health > 929999 Health not elsewhere classified
Identification Number or DOI: https://doi.org/10.1136/bjsports-2015-095567
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/32261

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