How much is too much? (Part 1) International Olympic Committee consensus statement on load in sport and risk of injury

Soligard, Torbjørn and Schwellnus, Martin and Alonso, Juan Manuel and Bahr, Roald and Clarsen, Ben and Dijkstra, H. Paul and Gabbett, Tim and Gleeson, Michael and Hagglund, Martin and Hutchinson, Mark R. and Janse van Rensburg, Christa and Khan, Karim M. and Meeusen, Romain and Orchard, John W. and Pluim, Babette M. and Raftery, Martin and Budgett, Richard and Engebretsen, Lars (2016) How much is too much? (Part 1) International Olympic Committee consensus statement on load in sport and risk of injury. British Journal of Sports Medicine, 50 (17). pp. 1030-1041. ISSN 0306-3674

Abstract

Athletes participating in elite sports are exposed to high training loads and increasingly saturated competition calendars. Emerging evidence indicates that poor load management is a major risk factor for injury. The International Olympic Committee convened an expert group to review the scientific evidence for the relationship of load (defined broadly to include rapid changes in training and competition load, competition calendar congestion, psychological load and travel) and health outcomes in sport. We summarise the results linking load to risk of injury in athletes, and provide athletes, coaches and support staff with practical guidelines to manage load in sport. This consensus statement includes guidelines for (1) prescription of training and competition load, as well as for (2) monitoring of training, competition and psychological load, athlete well-being and injury. In the process, we identified research priorities.


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Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Additional Information: Published version cannot be displayed due to copyright restrictions.
Faculty / Department / School: No Faculty
Date Deposited: 01 Jun 2017 05:02
Last Modified: 30 Nov 2017 04:54
Uncontrolled Keywords: fatigue; injury; load; recovery; well-being; athletic injuries; athletic performance; cumulative trauma disorders; early diagnosis; female; humans; male; physical education and training; practice guidelines as topic; professional practice; return to sport; risk factors; sports medicine; stress, psychological; travel; workload
Fields of Research : 11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1106 Human Movement and Sports Science > 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
Socio-Economic Objective: C Society > 92 Health > 9299 Other Health > 929999 Health not elsewhere classified
Identification Number or DOI: 10.1136/bjsports-2016-096581
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/32251

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