The influence of high-intensity compared with moderate-intensity exercise training on cardiorespiratory fitness and body composition in colorectal cancer survivors: a randomised controlled trial

Devin, James L. and Sax, Andrew T. and Hughes, Gareth I. and Jenkins, David G. and Aitken, Joanne F. and Chambers, Suzanne K. and Dunn, Jeffrey C. and Bolam, Kate A. and Skinner, Tina L. (2016) The influence of high-intensity compared with moderate-intensity exercise training on cardiorespiratory fitness and body composition in colorectal cancer survivors: a randomised controlled trial. Journal of Cancer Survivorship, 10 (3). pp. 467-479. ISSN 1932-2259

Abstract

Purpose: Following colorectal cancer diagnosis and anti-cancer therapy, declines in cardiorespiratory fitness and body composition lead to significant increases in morbidity and mortality. There is increasing interest within the field of exercise oncology surrounding potential strategies to remediate these adverse outcomes. This study compared 4 weeks of moderate-intensity exercise (MIE) and high-intensity exercise (HIE) training on peak oxygen consumption (V̇O2peak) and body composition in colorectal cancer survivors. Methods: Forty seven post-treatment colorectal cancer survivors (HIE = 27 months post-treatment; MIE = 38 months post-treatment) were randomised to either HIE [85–95 % peak heart rate (HRpeak)] or MIE (70 % HRpeak) in equivalence with current physical activity guidelines and completed 12 training sessions over 4 weeks. Results: HIE was superior to MIE in improving absolute (p = 0.016) and relative (p = 0.021) V̇O2peak. Absolute (+0.28 L.min−1, p < 0.001) and relative (+3.5 ml.kg−1.min−1, p < 0.001) V̇O2 peak were increased in the HIE group but not the MIE group following training. HIE led to significant increases in lean mass (+0.72 kg, p = 0.002) and decreases in fat mass (−0.74 kg, p < 0.001) and fat percentage (−1.0 %, p < 0.001), whereas no changes were observed for the MIE group. There were no severe adverse events. Conclusions: In response to short-term training, HIE is a safe, feasible and efficacious intervention that offers clinically meaningful improvements in cardiorespiratory fitness and body composition for colorectal cancer survivors. Implications for Cancer Survivors: HIE appears to offer superior improvements in cardiorespiratory fitness and body composition in comparison to current physical activity recommendations for colorectal cancer survivors and therefore may be an effective clinical utility following treatment.


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Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Additional Information: Files associated with this item cannot be displayed due to copyright restrictions.
Faculty / Department / School: No Faculty
Date Deposited: 08 Jun 2017 23:06
Last Modified: 08 Jun 2017 23:24
Uncontrolled Keywords: Body composition [MESH]; Cardiorespiratory fitness; Colorectal cancer [MESH]; Exercise oncology; Exercise [MESH]; High-intensity exercise; Adult; Aged; Body Composition; Cardiorespiratory Fitness; Colorectal Neoplasms; Exercise; Exercise Therapy; Female; Heart Rate; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Oxygen Consumption; Physical Fitness; Survivors;
Fields of Research : 11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1112 Oncology and Carcinogenesis > 111299 Oncology and Carcinogenesis not elsewhere classified
Socio-Economic Objective: E Expanding Knowledge > 97 Expanding Knowledge > 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
Identification Number or DOI: 10.1007/s11764-015-0490-7
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/32020

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