Economic evaluation of a psychological intervention for high distress cancer patients and carers: costs and quality-adjusted life years

Chatterton, Mary Lou and Chambers, Suzanne and Occhipinti, Stefano and Girgis, Afaf and Dunn, Jeffrey and Carter, Rob and Shih, Sophy and Mihalopoulos, Cathrine (2016) Economic evaluation of a psychological intervention for high distress cancer patients and carers: costs and quality-adjusted life years. Psycho-Oncology, 25 (7). pp. 857-864. ISSN 1057-9249

Abstract

Objective: This study compared the cost-effectiveness of a psychologist-led, individualised cognitive behavioural intervention (PI) to a nurse-led, minimal contact self-management condition for highly distressed cancer patients and carers. Methods: This was an economic evaluation conducted alongside a randomised trial of highly distressed adult cancer patients and carers calling cancer helplines. Services used by participants were measured using a resource use questionnaire, and quality-adjusted life years were measured using the assessment of quality of life – eight-dimension – instrument collected through a computer-assisted telephone interview. The base case analysis stratified participants based on the baseline score on the Brief Symptom Inventory. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratio confidence intervals were calculated with a nonparametric bootstrap to reflect sampling uncertainty. The results were subjected to sensitivity analysis by varying unit costs for resource use and the method for handling missing data. Results: No significant differences were found in overall total costs or quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) between intervention groups. Bootstrapped data suggest the PI had a higher probability of lower cost and greater QALYs for both carers and patients with high distress at baseline. For patients with low levels of distress at baseline, the PI had a higher probability of greater QALYs but at additional cost. Sensitivity analysis showed the results were robust. Conclusions: The PI may be cost-effective compared with the nurse-led, minimal contact self-management condition for highly distressed cancer patients and carers. More intensive psychological intervention for patients with greater levels of distress appears warranted.


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Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Additional Information: Files associated with this item cannot be displayed due to copyright restrictions.
Faculty / Department / School: No Faculty
Date Deposited: 07 Jun 2017 02:15
Last Modified: 08 Jun 2017 01:38
Uncontrolled Keywords: Cancer; Public Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology; Psychiatry; Health Policy, Economics and Management;
Fields of Research : 11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1112 Oncology and Carcinogenesis > 111299 Oncology and Carcinogenesis not elsewhere classified
Socio-Economic Objective: E Expanding Knowledge > 97 Expanding Knowledge > 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
Identification Number or DOI: 10.1002/pon.4020
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/32019

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