Sedentary time in adults and the association with diabetes, cardiovascular disease and death: Systematic review and meta-analysis

Wilmot, E. G. and Edwardson, C. L. and Achana, F. A. and Davies, M. J. and Gorely, T. and Gray, L. J. and Khunti, K. and Yates, T. and Biddle, S. J. H. (2012) Sedentary time in adults and the association with diabetes, cardiovascular disease and death: Systematic review and meta-analysis. Diabetologia, 55 (11). pp. 2895-2905. ISSN 0012-186X

Abstract

Aims/hypothesis Sedentary (sitting) behaviours are ubiquitous in modern society. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to examine the association of sedentary time with diabetes, cardiovascular disease and cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. Methods Medline, Embase and the Cochrane Library databases were searched for terms related to sedentary time and health outcomes. Cross-sectional and prospective studies were included. RR/HR and 95% CIs were extracted by two independent reviewers. Data were adjusted for baseline event rate and pooled using a random-effects model. Bayesian predictive effects and intervals were calculated to indicate the variance in outcomes that would be expected if new studies were conducted in the future. Results Eighteen studies (16 prospective, two cross-sectional) were included, with 794,577 participants. Fifteen of these studies were moderate to high quality. The greatest sedentary time compared with the lowest was associated with a 112% increase in the RR of diabetes (RR 2.12; 95%credible interval [CrI] 1.61, 2.78), a 147%increase in the RR of cardiovascular events (RR 2.47; 95% CI 1.44, 4.24), a 90% increase in the risk of cardiovascular mortality (HR 1.90; 95%CrI 1.36, 2.66) and a 49%increase in the risk of all-cause mortality (HR 1.49; 95% CrI 1.14, 2.03). The predictive effects and intervals were only significant for diabetes. Conclusions/interpretation Sedentary time is associated with an increased risk of diabetes, cardiovascular disease and cardiovascular and all-cause mortality; the strength of the association is most consistent for diabetes. © Springer-Verlag 2012.


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Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Additional Information: Files associated with this item cannot be displayed due to copyright restrictions.
Faculty / Department / School: No Faculty
Date Deposited: 10 May 2017 02:25
Last Modified: 10 May 2017 02:25
Uncontrolled Keywords: Cardiovascular; Diabetes; Meta-analysis; Mortality; Sedentary; Systematic review; General; Public Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology; Cardiovascular Diseases and Cardiovascular Surgery; CARDIAC DISORDERS; Cardiovascular Diseases and Cardiovascular Surgery; VASCULAR DISORDERS; Endocrinology; HORMONE-RELATED METABOLISM; Diabetes mellitus; Internal Medicine; CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM; Internal Medicine; ENDOCRINE SYSTEM; Diabetes;
Fields of Research : 11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1106 Human Movement and Sports Science > 110602 Exercise Physiology
Socio-Economic Objective: C Society > 92 Health > 9201 Clinical Health (Organs, Diseases and Abnormal Conditions) > 920103 Cardiovascular System and Diseases
C Society > 92 Health > 9201 Clinical Health (Organs, Diseases and Abnormal Conditions) > 920104 Diabetes
Identification Number or DOI: 10.1007/s00125-012-2677-z
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/31847

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