A randomised trial comparing low-fat diets differing in carbohydrate and protein ratio, combined with regular moderate intensity exercise, on glycaemic control, cardiometabolic risk factors, food cravings, cognitive function and psychological wellbeing in adults with type 2 diabetes: study protocol

Watson, Nerylee Ann and Dyer, Kathryn Ann and Buckley, Jonathan David and Brinkworth, Grant David and Coates, Alison Mary and Parfitt, Gaynor and Howe, Peter Ranald Charles and Noakes, Manny and Dye, Louise and Chadwick, Helen and Murphy, Karen Joy (2015) A randomised trial comparing low-fat diets differing in carbohydrate and protein ratio, combined with regular moderate intensity exercise, on glycaemic control, cardiometabolic risk factors, food cravings, cognitive function and psychological wellbeing in adults with type 2 diabetes: study protocol. Contemporary Clinical Trials, 45. pp. 217-225. ISSN 1551-7144

Abstract

Background: Hypocaloric low-fat diets, high in protein with moderate carbohydrate (HP) can enhance weight loss, improve glycaemic control and improve cardiometabolic health risk factors in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). However, it is unclear whether the metabolic benefits observed during weight loss are sustained during energy-balance and weight maintenance. Furthermore, there is a lack of evidence regarding the effect of HP diets on food cravings, cognitive function and psychological wellbeing in T2DM, despite carbohydrate food cravings, cognitive impairment and depression being associated with hyperglycaemia. Methods/design: Overweight/obese adults with T2DM were randomised to consume either a HP diet (n. = 32, ~. 32% protein, 33% carbohydrate, 30% fat) or a higher-carbohydrate diet (HC, n. = 29, ~. 22% protein, 51% carbohydrate, 22% fat) for 24 weeks with 30 min of moderate intensity exercise five days/week for the study duration. There were 2 phases: a 12 week weight loss phase followed by a 12 week weight maintenance phase. Primary outcome was glycaemic control (glycosylated haemoglobin; HbA1c). Secondary outcomes were cardiometabolic risk factors (body composition, fasting blood pressure, blood lipids, glucose, insulin and C-reactive protein), food cravings, cognitive function (memory; psychomotor and executive function and psychological well-being. Outcomes were measured at baseline and the end of each 12-week intervention phase. Data will be analysed as intention-to-treat using linear mixed effects models. Conclusion: This study will examine the effects of two dietary interventions on health outcomes in T2DM during weight loss and notably following weight maintenance where there is a paucity of evidence.


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Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Additional Information: Files associated with this item cannot be displayed due to copyright restrictions.
Faculty / Department / School: No Faculty
Date Deposited: 02 Jun 2017 06:03
Last Modified: 02 Jun 2017 06:03
Uncontrolled Keywords: Cardiometabolic; Cognitive; Diabetes; Glycemic; Protocol; Psychological; Blood Glucose; C-Reactive Protein; Cognition; Craving; Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2; Diet, Fat-Restricted; Dietary Carbohydrates; Dietary Proteins; Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated; Obesity; Overweight; Endocrine Pancreas; Diabetes, insulin, and glucose tolerance
Fields of Research : 11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1103 Clinical Sciences > 110399 Clinical Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio-Economic Objective: E Expanding Knowledge > 97 Expanding Knowledge > 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
Identification Number or DOI: 10.1016/j.cct.2015.11.001
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/31618

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