Maximal rate of increase in heart rate during the rest-exercise transition tracks reductions in exercise performance when training load is increased

Nelson, Maximillian J. and Thomson, Rebecca L. and Rogers, Daniel K. and Howe, Peter R. C. and Buckley, Jonathan D. (2014) Maximal rate of increase in heart rate during the rest-exercise transition tracks reductions in exercise performance when training load is increased. Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 17 (1). pp. 129-133. ISSN 1440-2440

Abstract

Objectives: Heart rate kinetics are faster in well-trained athletes at exercise onset, indicating sensitivity to training status, but whether they track performance changes due to changes in training load is unknown. Design: Randomised, counterbalanced, cross-over. Methods: 17 cyclists completed two weeks of light and two weeks of heavy training. The day after each training period heart rate was recorded during 5. min cycling at 100. W to determine the maximal rate of heart rate increase. Participants then performed a 5. min cycle time-trial after which heart rate recovery was determined. Results: Work during 5. min cycle time-trial decreased 3.5% (P<. 0.04) in participants (n= 8) who increased training load (completed light training then heavy training) and, although maximal rate of heart rate increase did not change (P= 0.27), within-individual changes in work were correlated with changes in maximal rate of heart rate increase (r= 0.87, P= 0.005). Work during 5. min cycle time-trial increased 6.5% (P< 0.001) in 9 participants who decreased training load (completed heavy training then light training) and maximal rate of heart rate increase increased 28% (P= 0.002) but the changes in maximal work were not related to changes in rate of heart rate increase (r= 0.32, P= 0.40). Heart rate recovery tended to track changes in 5. min cycle time-trial work following increases and decreases in training load (r= 0.65-0.75, P= 0.03-0.08). Conclusions: Maximal rate of heart rate increases during cycling at 100. W tracks reductions in exercise performance when training load is increased, but not performance improvements when training loads are reduced. Maximal rate of heart rate increase may be a useful adjunct to heart rate recovery for tracking changes in exercise performance.


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Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Additional Information: Files associated with this item cannot be displayed due to copyright restrictions.
Faculty / Department / School: No Faculty
Date Deposited: 04 Jun 2017 23:59
Last Modified: 04 Jun 2017 23:59
Uncontrolled Keywords: Cardiac autonomic function; Exercise performance; Fatigue; Heart rate recovery; Training load; Physiology;
Fields of Research : 11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1106 Human Movement and Sports Science > 110604 Sports Medicine
Socio-Economic Objective: E Expanding Knowledge > 97 Expanding Knowledge > 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
Identification Number or DOI: 10.1016/j.jsams.2013.02.016
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/31581

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