The impacts construction traffic has on pavements within residential subdivisions

Pease, Adam (2016) The impacts construction traffic has on pavements within residential subdivisions. [USQ Project]

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Abstract

The aim of this research project is to ascertain that if during the first year of an access streets design life, the road pavement is subjected to a peak in the traffic loadings. This peak is a result of the heavy vehicles used in the construction of residential dwellings. From the reviewed literature it is evident that passenger vehicles have very little effect on the pavement and heavy vehicles are the main cause of structural pavement failures. This puts a burden on the community as the local government must divert funding to rehabilitate a pavement asset which has failed prematurely.

Throughout this research project falling weight deflectometer (FWD) testing has been utilised, this is an appropriate testing method that is widely adopted by Transport and Main Roads (TMR). The non-destructive testing determined the structural characteristics of a number of existing access streets within North Shore Estate. The roads were selected to achieve a varied cross section of different access street pavements for the research. Analysis of this FWD test data highlighted that a number of roads had failed to meet the minimum deflection limits set by TMR which suggest the pavement has been impacted by the vehicles used in residential dwelling construction.

An alternative method for calculating the design Equivalent Standard Axles (ESA) has been developed to ensure the access street pavements can withstand the initial peak in the number of heavy vehicles during the first year. When applied to the Austroads pavement design charts, an increase in gravel thickness of approximately 30mm was required when compared to tradition Design ESA calculation methods. Further research and field testing of the alternative access street pavement designs are required to ensure this alternative design method can be endorsed and enforced by local government authorities.


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Item Type: USQ Project
Item Status: Live Archive
Additional Information: Bachelor of Engineering (Honours) Major Civil Engineering project
Faculty / Department / School: Current - Faculty of Health, Engineering and Sciences - School of Civil Engineering and Surveying
Supervisors: Somasundaraswaran, Soma
Date Deposited: 21 Jul 2017 02:43
Last Modified: 21 Jul 2017 02:43
Uncontrolled Keywords: road pavement; residential dwellings; traffic loadings; heavy vehicles; falling weight deflectometer (FWD); Equivalent Standard Axles (ESA)
Fields of Research : 09 Engineering > 0905 Civil Engineering > 090502 Construction Engineering
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/31456

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