Utilising satellite altimetry data to forecast the coastal impact from tropical cyclones: Cyclone Oswald as a case study

Stiller, Pascale (2016) Utilising satellite altimetry data to forecast the coastal impact from tropical cyclones: Cyclone Oswald as a case study. Honours thesis, University of Southern Queensland. (Unpublished)

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Abstract

Tropical cyclones are one of many climatic phenomena which occur around Australia, forming above the tropical waters around the equator. These systems can have large impacts due to heavy rainfall, storm tides, and strong winds, which can all be produced by tropical cyclones. As storm tides are likely to cause the most damage, the prediction of changes in sea surface height further out to sea during a tropical cyclone would be valuable. The aim of the research completed was to answer the research question “Can satellite altimetry data, combined with coastal tide gauge observations, be utilised to forecast the coastal impact of tropical cyclones?”. A focus was placed on tropical cyclone Oswald, with measured sea surface height, rainfall, and stream discharge along the coast of Queensland during the cyclone presented. A focus was also placed on Hervey Bay, Queensland, with the application of a multivariate regression model to sea level anomaly data measured by tide gauges at Burnett Heads and Rosslyn Bay, along with the sea level variances recorded by satellite altimeters TOPEX/Posiedon, Jason-1 and Jason-2 off the coast of Queensland. The results of the model showed a correlation of approximately 0.6 around the tide gauges used, and the two tests of the performance of the model determined that the model performed well in these areas. When compared to what occurred during Oswald around Hervey Bay, the measured data was able to be explained by the model. As a result, the model was proven to be able to be applied. Further research into how the number of tide gauges and the data used can improve the results of the model could be completed into the future.


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Item Type: Thesis (Non-Research) (Honours)
Item Status: Live Archive
Additional Information: Bachelor of Science (Honours) thesis.
Faculty / Department / School: Current - Faculty of Health, Engineering and Sciences - School of Agricultural, Computational and Environmental Sciences
Supervisors: Ribbe, Joachim Ribbe; Gharineiat, Zahra
Date Deposited: 11 Apr 2017 04:38
Last Modified: 11 Apr 2017 04:38
Uncontrolled Keywords: tropical cyclones; Cyclone Oswald; coastal impact
Fields of Research : 04 Earth Sciences > 0401 Atmospheric Sciences > 040105 Climatology (excl.Climate Change Processes)
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/31200

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