Randomized controlled trial of a web-based multi-modal therapy program for executive functioning in children and adolescents with unilateral cerebral palsy

Piovesana, Adina M. and Ross, Stephanie and Lloyd, Owen and Whittingham, Koa and Ziviani, Jenny and Ware, Robert S. and Boyd, Roslyn N. (2017) Randomized controlled trial of a web-based multi-modal therapy program for executive functioning in children and adolescents with unilateral cerebral palsy. Disability and Rehabilitation, 39 (20). pp. 2021-2028. ISSN 0963-8288

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Abstract

Abstract
Objective: To examine the efficacy of a multi-modal web-based therapy program, Move it to improve it (Mitii) delivered at home to improve Executive Functioning (EF) in children with an acquired brain injury (ABI).
Design: Randomised Waitlist Controlled Trial.
Setting: Home Environment
Participants: Sixty children with an ABI were matched in pairs by age and intelligence quotient then randomised to either 20-weeks of Mitii training or 20 weeks of Care As Usual (waitlist control; n=30; 17 males; mean age=11y, 11m (±2y, 6m); Full Scale IQ=76.24±17.84). Fifty-eight children completed baseline assessments (32 males; mean age=11.87±2.47; Full Scale IQ=75.21±16.76).
Main Measures: Executive functioning was assessed on four domains: attentional control, cognitive flexibility, goal setting, and information processing using subtests from the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC-IV), Delis-Kaplan Executive Functioning System (D-KEFS), Comprehensive Trail Making Test (CTMT), Tower of London (TOL), and Test of Everyday Attention for Children (Tea-Ch). Executive functioning performance in everyday life was assessed via parent questionnaire (Behaviour Rating Inventory of Executive Functioning; BRIEF).
Results: No differences were observed at baseline measures. Groups were compared at 20-weeks using linear regression with no significant differences found between groups on all measures of EF. Out of a potential total dose of 60 hours, children in the Mitii group completed a mean of 15 hours of Mitii intervention.
Conclusion: Results indicate no additional benefit to receiving Mitii compared to standard care. Mitii, in its current form, was not shown to improve EF in children with ABI.


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Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Additional Information: Submitted version deposited in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher.
Faculty / Department / School: Current - Faculty of Health, Engineering and Sciences - School of Psychology and Counselling
Date Deposited: 30 Jan 2017 05:13
Last Modified: 19 Dec 2017 01:43
Uncontrolled Keywords: Executive Functioning, Acquired Brain Injury, Intervention, RCT, Children and Adolescents
Fields of Research : 17 Psychology and Cognitive Sciences > 1701 Psychology > 170102 Developmental Psychology and Ageing
17 Psychology and Cognitive Sciences > 1701 Psychology > 170101 Biological Psychology (Neuropsychology, Psychopharmacology, Physiological Psychology)
17 Psychology and Cognitive Sciences > 1701 Psychology > 170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
Socio-Economic Objective: C Society > 92 Health > 9205 Specific Population Health (excl. Indigenous Health) > 920501 Child Health
C Society > 92 Health > 9202 Health and Support Services > 920201 Allied Health Therapies (excl. Mental Health Services)
Funding Details:
Identification Number or DOI: 10.1080/09638288.2016.1213899
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/29805

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