Heat transfer during cavitation bubble collapse

Qin, Zongyi and Alehossein, Habib (2016) Heat transfer during cavitation bubble collapse. Applied Thermal Engineering, 105. pp. 1067-1075. ISSN 1359-4311

Abstract

Cavitation phenomenon has found various industrial applications. The collapse process of a cavitation bubble is extremely violent in its final stage and the gas within the bubble can become extraordinarily hot. This paper introduces a heat transfer model to calculate accurately the temperature change and heat transfer during a bubble collapse based on the Rayleigh–Plesset (RP) equation and CFD modelling. To demonstrate the variations of pressure, temperature and velocity distribution in the liquid and bubble, a two-phase compressible CFD model developed to simulate the process of the bubble collapse. Results from the RP equation – modified with conduction and radiation effects – match the numerical CFD results very well. Further investigations were carried out on the bubble collapse and temperature increase, heat transfer rate by conduction and radiation, and accumulative heat transfer of bubbles with different bubble sizes. When a cavitation bubble with initial maximum radius of 2 mm collapses, the maximum temperature of the air can rise up over 0.02 mega degrees Kelvin (MK) and the transferred heat by radiation
and conduction accumulated in the first cycle of collapse can reach 40 micro-joules (μJ). The solution to the modified RP equation provides a practical method for the estimation of heat transfer and temperature increase in cavitation equipment.


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Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Additional Information: Permanent restricted access to Published version in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Cavitation phenomenon has found various industrial applications. The collapse process of a cavitation bubble is extremely violent in its final stage and the gas within the bubble can become extraordinarily hot. This paper introduces a heat transfer model to calculate accurately the temperature change and heat transfer during a bubble collapse based on the Rayleigh–Plesset (RP) equation and CFD modelling. To demonstrate the variations of pressure, temperature and velocity distribution in the liquid and bubble, a two-phase compressible CFD model developed to simulate the process of the bubble collapse. Results from the RP equation – modified with conduction and radiation effects – match the numerical CFD results very well. Further investigations were carried out on the bubble collapse and temperature increase, heat transfer rate by conduction and radiation, and accumulative heat transfer of bubbles with different bubble sizes. When a cavitation bubble with initial maximum radius of 2 mm collapses, the maximum temperature of the air can rise up over 0.02 mega degrees Kelvin (MK) and the transferred heat by radiation and conduction accumulated in the first cycle of collapse can reach 40 micro-joules (μJ). The solution to the modified RP equation provides a practical method for the estimation of heat transfer and temperature increase in cavitation equipment.
Faculty / Department / School: Current - Faculty of Health, Engineering and Sciences - School of Civil Engineering and Surveying
Date Deposited: 08 Jul 2016 05:31
Last Modified: 05 Sep 2017 02:56
Uncontrolled Keywords: heat transfer; cavitation; conduction; radiation; CFD; bubble simulation; Rayleigh–Plesset equation
Fields of Research : 01 Mathematical Sciences > 0103 Numerical and Computational Mathematics > 010399 Numerical and Computational Mathematics not elsewhere classified
Socio-Economic Objective: B Economic Development > 84 Mineral Resources (excl. Energy Resources) > 8402 Primary Mining and Extraction Processes of Mineral Resources > 840299 Primary Mining and Extraction of Mineral Resources not elsewhere classified
Identification Number or DOI: 10.1016/j.applthermaleng.2016.01.049
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/28987

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