The effects of inspiratory muscle training on plasma interleukin-6 concentration during cycling exercise and a volitional mimic of the exercise hyperpnea

Mills, Dean E. and Johnson, Michael A. and McPhilimey, Martin J. and Williams, Neil C. and Gonzalez, Javier T. and Barnett, Yvonne A. and Sharpe, Graham R. (2013) The effects of inspiratory muscle training on plasma interleukin-6 concentration during cycling exercise and a volitional mimic of the exercise hyperpnea. Journal of Applied Physiology, 115 (8). pp. 1163-1172. ISSN 8750-7587

Abstract

It is unknown whether the respiratory muscles contribute to exercise-induced increases in plasma interleukin-6 (IL-6) concentration, if this is related to diaphragm fatigue, and whether inspiratory muscle training (IMT) attenuates the plasma IL-6 response to whole body exercise and/or a volitional mimic of the exercise hyperpnea. Twelve healthy males were divided equally into an IMT or placebo (PLA) group, and before and after a 6-wk intervention they undertook, on separate days, 1 h of 1) passive rest, 2) cycling exercise at estimated maximal lactate steady state power (EX), and 3) volitional hyperpnea at rest, which mimicked the breathing and respiratory muscle recruitment patterns achieved during EX (HYPEX). Plasma IL-6 concentration remained unchanged during passive rest. The plasma IL-6 response to EX was reduced following IMT (main effect of intervention, P = 0.039) but not PLA (P = 0.272). Plasma IL-6 concentration increased during HYPEX (main effect of time, P < 0.01) and was unchanged postintervention. There was no evidence of diaphragm fatigue (measured by phrenic nerve stimulation) following each trial. In conclusion, plasma IL-6 concentration is increased during EX and HYPEX and this occurred in the absence of diaphragm fatigue. Furthermore, IMT reduced the plasma IL-6 response to EX but not HYPEX. These findings suggest that the respiratory muscles contribute to exercise-induced increases in plasma IL-6 concentration in the absence of diaphragm fatigue and that IMT can reduce the magnitude of the response to exercise but not a volitional mimic of the exercise hyperpnea.


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Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Additional Information: Files associated with this item cannot be displayed due to copyright restrictions.
Faculty / Department / School: Historic - Faculty of Health, Engineering and Sciences - School of Health, Nursing and Midwifery
Date Deposited: 03 Aug 2016 00:14
Last Modified: 14 Feb 2017 01:24
Fields of Research : 11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1106 Human Movement and Sports Science > 110602 Exercise Physiology
Identification Number or DOI: 10.1152/japplphysiol.00272.2013
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/28761

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