Prevalence of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS), lower bowel symptoms and sexual dysfunction after prostate cancer treatment

Baratiny, G. and Chiarelli, P. (2011) Prevalence of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS), lower bowel symptoms and sexual dysfunction after prostate cancer treatment. In: 38th COSA Annual Scientific Meeting (COSA 2011), 15-17 Nov 2011, Perth, WA, Australia.

Abstract

Aims: To examine the prevalence of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS), lower bowel symptoms (LBS) and sexual dysfunction (SD) after prostate cancer treatment.

Methods: In this cross-sectional study, recruitment was undertaken from 30 urban and rural prostate cancer support groups across NSW, Queensland and Northern Territory between July 2010 and March 2011. Validated
instruments were used to measure LUTS (ICIQ-LUT/ICSmaleSF), lower bowel symptoms (St Marks Incontinence Score) and sexual dysfunction (ICIQ-MLUTSsex/ICSmale). Participants were also asked to report whether they had been informed about potential side effects of prostate cancer (PC)
treatment and which health professional provided that information.

Results: 355 eligible current members of PC support groups agreed to participate, most of whom resided in urban areas (62%). Their mean age was 70 years (SD: 7.8; Range: 45–95). Radical prostatectomy was the predominant PC treatment (71%) followed by radiation therapy (30%). Participants recruited from rural support groups were signifi cantly more
likely to have undergone radiation therapy (39% of rural men vs. 25% of urban men; p = 0.001) than a prostatectomy (60% rural vs. 79% urban; p = 0.007). After PC treatment, men reported at least one LUTS (95%), SD (62%) and LBS (4.5%). Urinary incontinence was the most commonly
reported LUTS (74%). About 84% of the participants recalled receiving information about potential treatment side effects before undergoing PC treatment. Of these, the majority received that information from treating
specialists (96%).

Conclusions: While regional differences exist in regard to treatment protocols received by men attending support groups, there were no regional differences in the way participants received information about potential
treatment side effects. Despite improved treatment techniques, LUTS, LBS and SD remain prevalent after PC treatment. Although the risk of developing these clinical symptoms increases with age, this can be exacerbated by
PC treatment and more needs to be done to improve these symptoms.


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Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (Commonwealth Reporting Category E) (Poster)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Additional Information: Abstract only published - #440. Permanent restricted access , in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher.
Faculty / Department / School: Current - Institute for Agriculture and the Environment
Date Deposited: 31 Aug 2016 03:05
Last Modified: 07 Jul 2017 02:21
Uncontrolled Keywords: lower urinary tract symptoms; lower bowel symptoms; sexual dysfunction; prostate cancer; treatment
Fields of Research : 11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1112 Oncology and Carcinogenesis > 111204 Cancer Therapy (excl. Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy)
11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1117 Public Health and Health Services > 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
Identification Number or DOI: 10.1111/j.1743-7563.2011.01472.x
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/28624

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