Experimental investigation of trace element dissolution in formation water in the presence of supercritical CO2 fluid for a potential geological storage site of CO2 in Taiwan

Jean, Jiin-Shuh and Wang, Chien-Lih and Hsiang, Hsing-I. and Li, Zhaohui and Yang, Huai-Jen and Jiang, Wei-Teh and Yang, Kenn-Ming and Bundschuh, Jochen (2015) Experimental investigation of trace element dissolution in formation water in the presence of supercritical CO2 fluid for a potential geological storage site of CO2 in Taiwan. Journal of Natural Gas Science and Engineering, 23. pp. 304-314. ISSN 1875-5100

Abstract

The Pliocene Yutengping Sandstone (depth 1642e1882 m) and its overlying caprock shale (depth 1395 -1642 m) in Hsinchu City, central Taiwan, were intended for a storage site of CO2. Formation water was collected from a gas well located at a depth of 1827-1846 m. This study investigated changes in water chemistry and dissolution of trace elements from the sandstone and shale at 25 MPa and 90 degrees C in the
presence and absence of supercritical CO2 (scCO2) over 7 days. The results showed substantial dissolution of V, Cr, Co, Cu, and Rb from the sandstone and shale into formation water in the presence of scCO2 fluid, while the release of Zn, Se, Mo, and Cd from the sandstone and shale was minimal. Desorption of V, Cr,Mn, Fe, Sr, and Ba was more pronounced from the sandstone than from shale, whereas Co, Ni, Cu, As, and Mo desorbed more from the shale. The concentration of As in formation water increased from 1.4 mg/L to 130 mg/L after in contact with scCO2. Such a high As concentration may present a significant threat to shallow groundwater quality in this region, particularly if leakage along faults and rock fractures in the region occurred.


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Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Additional Information: Permanent restricted access to published version in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher.
Faculty / Department / School: Current - Faculty of Health, Engineering and Sciences - School of Civil Engineering and Surveying
Date Deposited: 03 Feb 2016 06:27
Last Modified: 01 Aug 2016 01:28
Uncontrolled Keywords: desorption; dissolution; fluid-rock interaction; mobilization; sequestration; supercritical CO2
Fields of Research : 05 Environmental Sciences > 0502 Environmental Science and Management > 050204 Environmental Impact Assessment
09 Engineering > 0907 Environmental Engineering > 090703 Environmental Technologies
Socio-Economic Objective: D Environment > 96 Environment > 9606 Environmental and Natural Resource Evaluation > 960699 Environmental and Natural Resource Evaluation not elsewhere classified
Identification Number or DOI: 10.1016/j.jngse.2015.02.006
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/28492

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