Application of effective drought index for quantification of meteorological drought events: a case study in Australia

Deo, Ravinesh C. and Byun, Hi-Ryong and Adamowski, Jan F. and Begum, Khaleda (2017) Application of effective drought index for quantification of meteorological drought events: a case study in Australia. Theoretical and Applied Climatology, 128 (1-2). pp. 359-379. ISSN 0177-798X

Abstract

Drought indices (DIs) that quantify drought events by their onset, termination, and subsequent properties such as the severity, duration, and peak intensity are practical stratagems for monitoring and evaluating the impacts of drought. In this study, the effective drought index (EDI) calculated over daily timescales was utilized to quantify short-term (dry spells) and ongoing drought events using drought monitoring data in Australia. EDI was an intensive DI that considered daily water accumulation with a weighting function applied to daily rainfall data with the passage of time. A statistical analysis of the distribution of water deficit period relative to the base period was performed where a run-sum method was adopted to identify drought onset for any day (i) with EDI i  < 0 (rainfall below normal). Drought properties were enumerated in terms of (1) severity (AEDI ≡ accumulated sum of EDIi < 0), (2) duration (DS ≡ cumulative number of days with EDIi < 0), (3) peak intensity (EDImin ≡ minimum EDI of a drought event), (4) annual drought severity (YAEDI ≡ yearly accumulated negative EDI), and (5) accumulated severity of ongoing drought using event-accumulated EDI (EAEDI). The analysis of EDI signal enabled the detection and quantification of a number of drought events in Australia: Federation Drought (1897–1903), 1911–1916 Drought, 1925–1929 Drought, World War II Drought (1937–1945), and Millennium Drought (2002–2010). In comparison with the other droughts, Millennium Drought was exemplified as an unprecedented dry period especially in Victoria (EAEDI ≈ −4243, DS = 1946 days, EDImin = −4.05, and YAEDI = −4903). For the weather station tested in Northern Territory, the worst drought was recorded during 1925–1929 period. The results justified the suitability of effective drought index as a useful scientific tool for monitoring of drought progression, onset and termination, and ranking of drought based on severity, duration, and peak intensity, which allows an assessment of accumulated stress caused by short- and long-term (protracted) dry events


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Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Additional Information: Permanent restricted access to Published version in accordance with the copyirhgt policy of the publisher.
Faculty / Department / School: Current - Faculty of Health, Engineering and Sciences - School of Agricultural, Computational and Environmental Sciences
Date Deposited: 07 Jan 2016 02:03
Last Modified: 19 Dec 2017 23:34
Uncontrolled Keywords: drought indices; effective drought index; EDI; Australia
Fields of Research : 01 Mathematical Sciences > 0104 Statistics > 010401 Applied Statistics
01 Mathematical Sciences > 0104 Statistics > 010406 Stochastic Analysis and Modelling
04 Earth Sciences > 0401 Atmospheric Sciences > 040105 Climatology (excl.Climate Change Processes)
05 Environmental Sciences > 0502 Environmental Science and Management > 050205 Environmental Management
01 Mathematical Sciences > 0102 Applied Mathematics > 010299 Applied Mathematics not elsewhere classified
05 Environmental Sciences > 0502 Environmental Science and Management > 050206 Environmental Monitoring
09 Engineering > 0905 Civil Engineering > 090509 Water Resources Engineering
Socio-Economic Objective: E Expanding Knowledge > 97 Expanding Knowledge > 970105 Expanding Knowledge in the Environmental Sciences
D Environment > 96 Environment > 9610 Natural Hazards > 961099 Natural Hazards not elsewhere classified
D Environment > 96 Environment > 9603 Climate and Climate Change > 960301 Climate Change Adaptation Measures
D Environment > 96 Environment > 9603 Climate and Climate Change > 960307 Effects of Climate Change and Variability on Australia (excl. Social Impacts)
E Expanding Knowledge > 97 Expanding Knowledge > 970104 Expanding Knowledge in the Earth Sciences
E Expanding Knowledge > 97 Expanding Knowledge > 970101 Expanding Knowledge in the Mathematical Sciences
D Environment > 96 Environment > 9602 Atmosphere and Weather > 960203 Weather
Funding Details:
Identification Number or DOI: 10.1007/s00704-015-1706-5
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/28284

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